18 years later: Honoring Flight 93 victims on anniversary of 9/11 | TribLIVE.com
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18 years later: Honoring Flight 93 victims on anniversary of 9/11

Renatta Signorini
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Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
The 9/11 Memorial Service at the Flight 93 National Memorial near Shanksville took place on Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2019.
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Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Fog drifts across the fields as the National Park Service prepares for the 9/11 memorial observance Sept. 11, 2019, at the Flight 93 National Memorial.
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Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Michael Collins, a U.S Navy member based in Pittsburgh, waits as crowds begin to gather for the memorial observance ceremony on Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2019 for the 9/11 Memorial Service at the Flight 93 National Memorial near Shanksville.
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Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Vice President Mike Pence, with his wife Karen Pence, greet family members as they arrive on Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2019 for the 9/11 Memorial Service at the Flight 93 National Memorial near Shanksville.
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Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
The audience listens to Vice President Mike Pence on Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2019 during the 9/11 Memorial Service at the Flight 93 National Memorial near Shanksville.
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Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Security watches from the memorial plaza above the crowd on Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2019 for the 9/11 Memorial Service at the Flight 93 National Memorial near Shanksville.

Dignitaries and families of those aboard United Airlines Flight 93 are gathering in Somerset County this morning for the 18th annual remembrance of the 40 people who died fighting back against terrorists.

Vice President Mike Pence and Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt were keynote speakers for the observance at the Flight 93 National Memorial in Stonycreek Township. The memorial honors the 40 passengers and crew members who were aboard the plane on Sept. 11, 2001.

Pence received a standing ovation as he walked to the podium.

People in the crowd used their cellphones to take pictures of him. The men and women of Flight 93 who sprang into action and began calling family members “met unspeakable evil with selfless heroism and American strength,” he said.

He recounted the group’s actions formulating a plan and charging the cockpit.

“They were ordinary Americans but their heroism would inspire the nation.”

The plane was believed to be destined for Washington, D.C., a short 18 minutes by air from the site of the crash.

Renatta Signorini is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Renatta at 724-837-5374, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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