ShareThis Page
Sewickley

Quaker Valley hockey teams kicked off season by volunteering at World Vision

| Monday, Oct. 2, 2017, 11:00 p.m.
Quaker Valley hockey teams helped kick off the season again by doing good off the ice. Nine varsity and bantam players, plus two parents, spent three hours Sept. 23, 2017, sorting women’s clothing and other items at the World Vision Pittsburgh Global Distribution Center for gifts-in-kind in Aleppo.
Back row from left are Alex MacDonald, Jake McMullen, Nico Simakas, Ethan Cadwell. Middle row are Colin Rice and Chris Barefoot. Front row are Hannah Fetterolf, Claudia Kronk and Bob Carey.
Submitted
Quaker Valley hockey teams helped kick off the season again by doing good off the ice. Nine varsity and bantam players, plus two parents, spent three hours Sept. 23, 2017, sorting women’s clothing and other items at the World Vision Pittsburgh Global Distribution Center for gifts-in-kind in Aleppo. Back row from left are Alex MacDonald, Jake McMullen, Nico Simakas, Ethan Cadwell. Middle row are Colin Rice and Chris Barefoot. Front row are Hannah Fetterolf, Claudia Kronk and Bob Carey.

Quaker Valley hockey teams helped kick off the season again by doing good off the ice.

Nine varsity and bantam players, plus two parents, spent three hours Sept. 23 sorting women's clothing and other items at the World Vision Pittsburgh Global Distribution Center for gifts-in-kind in Aleppo.

Quaker Valley Hockey Association board secretary Suzanne Bemis said it was the fourth year the squads volunteered at the center.

World Vision is a Christian humanitarian organization that works with families and communities worldwide to fight poverty and injustice. Through its gifts-in-kind program, it distributes high-quality donations of medical supplies, clothes, shoes, school supplies and personal care products.

Laura Kennedy, volunteer coordinator at the center, said besides sorting, players put together clothing boxes and moved them to pallets. She said what they produced will go international.

Some of the women's clothing, she said, is assigned to be shipped to Albania.

“We are excited to be a part of many sports teams (who) come to World Vision as a team-building opportunity,” Kennedy said. “It's great to watch how they interact and come together for a common goal.”

Bantam player Alex MacDonald, 12, a seventh grader, enjoyed contributing.

“I am very lucky to have the opportunity to help people who need it,” he said. “It is important that people like me who have lots in their life help those who don't.”

Bantam player Claudia Cronk, 12, a sixth grader, was surprised by how generous companies are in donating brand-new clothing.

Bantam player Hannah Fetterolf, 12, a sixth grader, said it felt awesome pulling together to help people around the world.

Varsity player Colin Rice, a sophomore, who will turn 16 on Oct. 8, said he had fun.

“(It) was a great feeling we were helping people,” Rice said.

Annette Cronauer, MacDonald's mother, was a parent volunteer.

“One of my favorite things about the QV hockey program is that it requires players to give back to the community,” she said.

Bemis said in the past, players have served meals at a nonprofit mission center and helped elementary school students with their homework.

Varsity players assist with the development program in the spring.

Karen Kadilak is a Tribune-Review contributing writer.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me