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South Hills

Grant helps Baldwin Borough Public Library teach youngsters about author

| Tuesday, Dec. 27, 2016, 12:00 p.m.
Lara Al Imam, 7, of Baldwin Borough looks at her artwork during an art show at Baldwin Borough Public Library.
Randy Jarosz | for the Tribune-Review
Lara Al Imam, 7, of Baldwin Borough looks at her artwork during an art show at Baldwin Borough Public Library.
Madison Ernst, 17,  Cynthia Hayhurst, 15, and Tabitha Schmidt, 15, all of Baldwin Borough, provide holiday music during an art show at Baldwin Borough Public Library.
Randy Jarosz | for the Tribune-Review
Madison Ernst, 17, Cynthia Hayhurst, 15, and Tabitha Schmidt, 15, all of Baldwin Borough, provide holiday music during an art show at Baldwin Borough Public Library.
Jason Campbell, left, and Sean Campbell, 9, of Baldwin Borough look at some artwork during an art show at Baldwin Borough Public Library.
Randy Jarosz | for the Tribune-Review
Jason Campbell, left, and Sean Campbell, 9, of Baldwin Borough look at some artwork during an art show at Baldwin Borough Public Library.
Samantha Dallmus, 8, of Baldwin Borough looks at some art at a show at Baldwin Borough Public Library.
Randy Jarosz | for the Tribune-Review
Samantha Dallmus, 8, of Baldwin Borough looks at some art at a show at Baldwin Borough Public Library.

The holiday art show at Baldwin Borough Public Library showcased the works of elementary school students and celebrated the life of children's author Ezra Jack Keats.

A $500 grant from the Ezra Jack Keats Foundation enabled the Baldwin library to hold a number of programs related to Keats, including the art show. Library youth services coordinator Dolores Colarosa was one of 63 educators from across the country to receive the grant.

Keats' Kids Art Nights were offered once a month in the fall at the library for students in kindergarten through the fifth grade. The grant als enabled the program to educate about 140 second-graders at Paynter Elementary School about Keats and his books, which include “The Snowy Day” and “Peter's Chair.”

At the library and school programs, students learned artistic elements represented in Keats' books. They experimented with different types of paints and created artwork about a book.

“It's their interpretation of one of his books through art,” Colarosa said.

The artwork was displayed for the public to view Dec. 21. The grant enabled the library staff to purchase supplies needed for the program.

The grant was a way to honor Keats, who would have turned 100 in 2016. He died in 1983.

Jim Spezialetti is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 412-388-5805 or jspezialetti@tribweb.com.

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