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South Hills

Pleasant Hills officer recognized with service award

| Wednesday, Aug. 16, 2017, 2:12 p.m.
Pleasant Hills police Officer Ronald Porupsky (right) was recognized in July 2017 by the National Association of School Resource Officers with the organization’s Regional Exceptional Service Award. Porupsky serves as the school resource office in the West Jefferson Hills School District.
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Pleasant Hills police Officer Ronald Porupsky (right) was recognized in July 2017 by the National Association of School Resource Officers with the organization’s Regional Exceptional Service Award. Porupsky serves as the school resource office in the West Jefferson Hills School District.
Pleasant Hills police Officer Ronald Porupsky (right) was recognized in July 2017 by the National Association of School Resource Officers with the organization’s Regional Exceptional Service Award. Porupsky serves as the school resource office in the West Jefferson Hills School District.
Submitted
Pleasant Hills police Officer Ronald Porupsky (right) was recognized in July 2017 by the National Association of School Resource Officers with the organization’s Regional Exceptional Service Award. Porupsky serves as the school resource office in the West Jefferson Hills School District.

Pleasant Hills police Officer Ronald Porupsky was recognized last month by the National Association of School Resource Officers with the organization's Regional Exceptional Service Award.

Porupsky serves as the school resource office in the West Jefferson Hills School District.

He was one of 10 officers in the country to receive the award, which recognizes continuous and sustained service to the school community above and beyond that is normally expected of an SRO.

“Receiving the award was a welcome surprise,” said Porupsky, who attended the NASRO School Safety Conference in Washington, D.C.

To receive the award, Porupsky had to be nominated and needed several letters of recommendation from school administrators.

The after-school interest groups at Pleasant Hills Middle School was highlighted in Porupsky's nomination. Middle school students can participate in weekly groups, which started out as learning a new hobby. The program expanded to include first responders providing students with insight into what their jobs entail and offering youths a chance to learn life-saving skills.

Porupsky also runs the Drug Abuse Resistance Education, or DARE, program at McClellan Elementary School. This school year, he plans to bring the DARE program to the middle school.

His goal is to get into the classrooms more and offer life lessons for the students.

“They see you as a human being, as another person they can turn to,” Porupsky said.

Porupsky also brought a defensive tactics class to the district for faculty members. He is a certified instructor for the Sexual Harassment/Assault Response Prevention Program, which he hopes to continue in the district.

Porupsky also shares information with parents in a Facebook group accessible at facebook.com/groups/pleasanthillspdsro.

Porupsky said he always is looking for ways to better the lives of the students.

“I'm continually working to make the school environment safer for the kids,” he said.

Jim Spezialetti is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 412-388-5805, jspezialetti@tribweb.com or via Twitter @TribJimSpez.

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