5 things to do in Westmoreland this weekend: Sept. 6-8 | TribLIVE.com
Westmoreland

5 things to do in Westmoreland this weekend: Sept. 6-8

Jonna Miller
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Musician Jonny Lang attends the 2014 National Association of Music Merchants show media preview day. He performs at The Palace Theatre Sept. 6.

TGIF!

You’ve felt it, too. It’s that slight chill in the morning, the rustle of the leaves … fall is in the air. The nights are cooler, but the days still spectacular. Soak it all in and get out and enjoy this weekend.

Rockin’ in the park

Jocelyn and Chris Arndt take to the stage in Greensburg’s St. Clair Park Saturday evening at 7. Pack a basket, bring a blanket and enjoy a little rock, pop and blues from this brother-and-sister duo.

Pre-show music by Hayley Daily and Joshua Carns starts at 6:30 p.m. The SummerSounds show is sponsored by Toyota of Greensburg.

Details: summersounds.com

Help fight hunger

Spend your Saturday in beautiful Keystone Park for some exercise and a good deed.

The Lions Lunchables “Pace the Park” 5K/Fun Walk begins 8:30 a.m. and raises funds to provide food for students of the James H. Metzgar Elementary School for the weekends. The school is part of the Greensburg Salem School District.

The program is sponsored by the Delmont, New Alexandria and Slickville Lions Clubs. Come out to the Derry Township park and take the “steps” necessary to help fight hunger.

Details: facebook.com

Get your blues on

Jonny Lang, the blues prodigy who hit it big as a teen, is still going strong two decades later. Lang performs his songbook at The Palace Theatre, Greensburg Friday at 8 p.m.

According to his official website: “What began as a bluesy sound, influenced by electric pioneers like Albert Collins, B. B. King and Buddy Guy, evolved over those recordings into a modern R&B style closer to Stevie Wonder and contemporary gospel music. Lang’s distinctive, blues-inflected licks appeared on every album, but became one element in a sea of passionately sung and tightly arranged songs.”

And yes, we still call “Lie to Me” our favorite.

Details: thepalacetheatre.org

Doo wop

The Pittsburgh Doo Wop Big Band will dazzle with the hits of the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s as it plays Irwin’s Lamp Theatre Saturday evening. Under the direction of Richard Mansfield, the award-winning musical director/arranger and conductor of the nationally acclaimed PBS “American Soundtrack Series,” the band has recreated the same great musical arrangements as seen and heard on PBS, according to the band’s Facebook page.

Details: lamptheatre.org

Treasure hunt

What better way to start your Sunday than by poking around tables, boxes and baskets for some one-of-a-kind treasures? Get thee to the Antiques and Collectibles Market at Historic Hanna’s Town in Hempfield.

A community tradition since 1974, the market is a haven for lovers of antiques and anyone seeking cool, vintage stuff. Browse for bargains, hit up a food booth or two and help support local history preservation. Proceeds from this event have been vital for the re-creation of Historic Hanna’s Town.

This event will be held rain or shine. Sorry, no pets are permitted.

Details: westmorelandhistory.org

Editor’s note: The concert is St. Clair Park was originally listed as Friday evening.

Jonna Miller is a Tribune-Review features editor. You can contact Jonna at 724-850-1270, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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