700 motorcycles tour Alle-Kiski Valley to remember Officer Brian Shaw | TribLIVE.com
Valley News Dispatch

700 motorcycles tour Alle-Kiski Valley to remember Officer Brian Shaw

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Joyce Hanz | For the Tribune-Review
The second annual 2019 Officer Brian Shaw Memorial Scholarship Ride motorcade makes it way from Lower Burrell in New Kensington as it crossed Tarentum Bridge Road (Route 366) on Sunday.
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Joyce Hanz | For the Tribune-Review
The second annual 2019 Officer Brian Shaw Memorial Scholarship Ride motorcade, led by a police car, makes it way northbound Sunday on the Route 28 expressway.
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Joyce Hanz | For the Tribune-Review
Savannah Ferry, 15, and her dad, Dan Ferry of New Alexandria, prepare to ride in the second annual 2019 Officer Brian Shaw Memorial Scholarship Ride on Sunday at the Syria Shriner Center in Harmar.
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Joyce Hanz | For the Tribune-Review
Hundreds of motorcycle riders prepare to ride in the second annual 2019 Officer Brian Shaw Memorial Scholarship Ride on Sunday at the Syria Shriner Center in Harmar.
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Joyce Hanz | For the Tribune-Review
The second annual 2019 Officer Brian Shaw Memorial Scholarship Ride motorcade makes it way northbound Sunday on the Route 28 expressway.
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Joyce Hanz | For the Tribune-Review
The second annual 2019 Officer Brian Shaw Memorial Scholarship Ride motorcade makes it way through Lower Burrell on Sunday.
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Joyce Hanz | For the Tribune-Review
Hundreds of motorcycle riders prepare to ride in the second annual 2019 Officer Brian Shaw Memorial Scholarship Ride on Sunday at the Syria Shriner Center in Harmar.

They rode in remembrance.

The second annual Officer Brian Shaw Memorial Scholarship Ride and Event welcomed more than 700 motorcycles under a brilliant blue sky Sunday.

The 41-mile charity ride kicked off at 10 a.m. at the Pittsburgh Shrine Center in Harmar, with an almost two-hour route that led bikers through the Alle-Kiski Valley. Among the communities that the ride passed through were Frazer, Tarentum, Harrison, Freeport, Ford City, Lower Burrell, Vandergrift, Allegheny Township, Lower Burrell, New Kensington, Springdale and Cheswick.

There were more than 700 motorcyles registered for the ride. Since hundreds of drivers had a passenger on the back, it was estimated that at least 1,000 people rode in the motorcade.

Shaw, a Lower Burrell resident and New Kensington police officer, was shot and killed during a traffic stop in November 2017 in New Kensington. He was 25.

“We are hoping this ride is a sustainable event,” said Steve Freiberg, a Buffalo Township police officer and event participant/volunteer.

Freiberg worked with Shaw in West Deer.

“This is a great ride for a great cause, and it’s meant to do great things,” Freiberg said.

The event included live entertainment, food and auction baskets with more than 130 local businesses, individuals and organizations donating.

Last year’s proceeds raised more than $40,000 for a scholarship bearing Shaw’s name that helps future officers attend the Allegheny County Police Training Academy, from which Shaw graduated. The amount of proceeds from Sunday’s event was not immediately available.

Joyce Hanz is a Tribune-Review contributing writer.

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