ATI employees give Tarentum’s Dreshar Stadium a new look on Day of Caring | TribLIVE.com
Valley News Dispatch

ATI employees give Tarentum’s Dreshar Stadium a new look on Day of Caring

Brian C. Rittmeyer
1669944_web1_vnd-dresharpaint1-091419
Brian C. Rittmeyer | Tribune-Review
ATI employees Jeff Nelson (on ladder) of Cranberry and Jared Wiesen of Shadyside paint at Dreshar Stadium in Tarentum on Friday, Sept. 13, 2019, as part of the United Way of Southwestern Pennsylvania’s 17th annual Day of Caring.
1669944_web1_vnd-dresharpaint2-091419
Brian C. Rittmeyer | Tribune-Review
Karen Sadowsky of Harrison, an administrator at ATI, paints at Dreshar Stadium in Tarentum as part of the United Way of Southwestern Pennsylvania’s Day of Caring on Friday, Sept. 13, 2019.
1669944_web1_vnd-dresharpaint3-091419
Brian C. Rittmeyer | Tribune-Review
ATI employees, from left, Dylan McNany of Plum, Jared Wiesen of Shadyside and Eric Kellaway of Allegheny Township paint at Dreshar Stadium in Tarentum on Friday, Sept. 13, 2019, as part of their company’s participation in the United Way of Southwestern Pennsylvania’s 17th annual Day of Caring.
1669944_web1_vnd-dresharpaint4-091419
Brian C. Rittmeyer | Tribune-Review
Liam Begley of Mars, an account representative at ATI, paints at Dreshar Stadium in Tarentum on Friday, Sept. 13, 2019.

Out with the red, in with the beige.

Tarentum’s Dreshar Stadium is sporting a new look thanks to volunteers from ATI.

Thirteen employees from the steel company painted the back wall of the bleachers at the First Avenue field as part of its participation in the United Way of Southwestern Pennsylvania’s 17th annual Day of Caring.

They were among nearly 700 volunteers that were expected to be participating, according to the United Way.

“I just thought it would be nice to come out and do something for the community,” said Liam Begley of Mars, an account representative at ATI.

They started work around 8 a.m. and got a first coat of paint on pretty quickly.

“Hopefully we can get done before it gets too hot,” Begley said.

While they did the work, the borough bought the supplies, according to council President Erika Josefoski.

“We decided to go with a neutral paint color rather than the bright red that is currently there,” she said.

Josefoski said ATI reached out to the borough and asked if there were any projects in town on which they could work.

Painting at the stadium “was one we thought would make a big impact in a short amount of time,” she said. “We’re excited to get this done and we really appreciate them doing it.”

ATI was paying its employees for the day, said Chris Bertha, executive assistant to ATI Flat Rolled Products President Kim Fields.

The company had two other groups out Friday, helping with activities at Greater Latrobe’s Baggaley Elementary School in Unity and working at the Girl Scouts’ Camp Skymeadow in Kiski Township.

Fields said ATI tries to be active in the communities in which it has operations.

“It’s fun,” she said. “I think everybody enjoys it.”

Karen Sadowsky, an ATI administrator from Harrison, took part in the Day of Caring last year, painting at the Try Life Center in Lower Burrell.

“I enjoy painting and I enjoy helping people,” she said.

Brian C. Rittmeyer is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Brian at 724-226-4701, [email protected] or via Twitter .

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.