Developer showcases former Alcoa research center that he spent years, millions to redo | TribLIVE.com
Valley News Dispatch

Developer showcases former Alcoa research center that he spent years, millions to redo

Emily Balser
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Emily Balser | Tribune-Review
Blue Ross, 13, of Lower Burrell performs her aerial silk acrobat routine at the Arts, Beats and Treats Festival at the former Alcoa research center in New Kensington on Sunday, Aug. 18, 2019.
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Emily Balser | Tribune-Review
Mary Peterson, of Wilkins, shows her homemade jewelry at the Arts, Beats and Treats Festival at the former Alcoa research center in New Kensington on Sunday, Aug. 18, 2019.
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Emily Balser | Tribune-Review
Local artist Myra Maslowsky of East Deer stands with her paintings at the Arts, Beats and Treats Festival at the former Alcoa research center in New Kensington on Sunday, Aug. 18, 2019.
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Emily Balser | Tribune-Review
Paintings done by Myra Maslowsky of East Deer are shown at the Arts, Beats and Treats Festival at the former Alcoa research center in New Kensington on Sunday, Aug. 18, 2019.

Patti and Dominic Giordano have lived in New Kensington their whole lives, and they’re glad to see someone restoring one of the city’s most notable landmarks — the former Alcoa property.

“This is a piece of New Kensington and Pennsylvania history,” Dominic Giordano said. “It’s nice he’s keeping it alive.”

Residents got to see the property during the Arts, Beats and Treats Festival this weekend that featured nearly 30 vendors including aerial silk acrobats, a magician and local artists.

The property was purchased by Steve Kubrick nine years ago, and he has put millions into remodeling it.

He’s turned part of the 22-acre property into an event venue for weddings and parties. The festival was a way to showcase what the property has to offer and bring more people to the community.

“We just want to get the word out that we have this great place to have events,” said Diane Heidenreich, event coordinator.

Kubrick said he was happy with the turnout, which was estimated to be around 1,000 people.

“A lot of different artists from around as far as Virginia came to check out the building,” he said.

Sisters Mary Peterson and Linda Satkoske, both of Wilkins, were vendors at the event. Peterson sells her own homemade jewelry, and Satkoske sells repurposed wine bottles that have been decorated and installed with lights.

“We’re very pleased with this (event),” Peterson said. “I think this will be fabulous as an event center.”

Both said they plan to come back to events here.

Local artist Myra Maslowsky of East Deer was selling some of her paintings.

“It’s just heavenly,” she said. “Just being a part of this and bringing people in.”

Maslowsky moved back to the area about 12 years ago after living in the Washington, D.C., area for much of her career. She often participated in festivals and art shows there.

“This has brought me back to there,” she said. “I really love doing this stuff.”

Kubrick said he’s just happy to have so many people visit the area and he looks forward to doing it again next year.

“I just think community things like this is what’s going to rebuild America,” he said. “I think the rest will come naturally. It is a safe place, and we had a blast.”

Emily Balser is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Emily at 724-226-4680, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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