Harrison police arrest man after claiming to smell pot in his car | TribLIVE.com
Valley News Dispatch

Harrison police arrest man after claiming to smell pot in his car

Madasyn Lee
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A Harrison police officer used his nose to thwart a potential drug deal Monday when he smelled what he suspected to be marijuana coming from a Tarentum man’s car.

Police said they pulled over a car driven by Philip N. Narcisse, 44, on Garfield Street at about 8 p.m.

A criminal complaint filed against Narcisse said the man allegedly told police he had nothing inside his car, and he had just given a ride to a friend who had been smoking marijuana. The complaint also stated that Narcisse admitted his license was under a DUI-related suspension.

Narcisse could not be reached Tuesday.

Officer Christopher Cottone said he and another officer were helping a tractor trailer turn at Federal and Vine streets when Narcisse’s car passed by them with its windows down.

There was an “overwhelming smell and pungent odor of burnt marijuana emanating from the vehicle,” Cottone said.

Cottone got into his patrol vehicle and followed the car.

“The entire time I kept smelling the odor of raw marijuana,” Cottone wrote in the complaint.

When Narcisse opened the car’s glove compartment, Cottone said, several clear sandwich bags fell to the floor. Narcisse was taken out of the car by another officer, and the car was searched.

Inside the car, police say they found two brown shipping boxes that contained four sandwich bags packaged with approximately 40 grams of suspected marijuana.

During the arrest, Narcisse received 15 calls and eight text messages on his cellphone, which police said in the complaint is common for suspected drug dealers who may be on their way to deliver drugs. According to the complaint, police believe Narcisse was on his way to deliver marijuana to the people calling his phone.

Narcisse faces multiple drug charges and as well as a traffic violation for driving with a suspended license.

He was released on a non-monetary bond Tuesday. A preliminary hearing is set for Sept. 25.

Madasyn Lee is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Madasyn at [email protected], 724-226-4702 or via Twitter.

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