Highlands preK students visit Highland Hose fire hall in Tarentum | TribLIVE.com
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Highlands preK students visit Highland Hose fire hall in Tarentum

Brian C. Rittmeyer
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Brian C. Rittmeyer | Tribune-Review
Highland Hose fire Chief Terry Chambon talks with a group of Highlands prekindgarten students at his fire hall on Thursday, May 16, 2019.
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Brian C. Rittmeyer | Tribune-Review
Highland Hose fire Chief Terry Chambon shows a county hazardous materials response truck to Highlands prekindergarten students during a tour of his fire hall in Tarentum on Thursday, May 16, 2019.
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Brian C. Rittmeyer | Tribune-Review
Highland Hose fire Chief Terry Chambon shows a fire truck to Highlands prekindergarten students when they visited the fire hall in Tarentum during a field trip on Thursday, May 16, 2019.
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Brian C. Rittmeyer | Tribune-Review
Highland Hose fire Chief Terry Chambon talks with Highlands prekindgarten students outside his fire hall on Thursday, May 16, 2019.
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Brian C. Rittmeyer | Tribune-Review
An adult helps Highlands prekindergarten students get out of the Highlands Hose ladder truck during their visit to the fire hall in Tarentum on Thursday, May 16, 2019.
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Brian C. Rittmeyer | Tribune-Review
Highlands prekindergarten students gather for a picture in front of Highland Hose’s ladder truck during their field trip to the fire hall on Thursday, May 16, 2019.

The tires on the trucks were bigger than them.

Students in Highlands School District’s prekindergarten program got out of school on a warm and sunny Thursday to visit the Highland Hose fire hall in Tarentum.

Chief Terry Chambon greeted visiting classes in the morning and afternoon.

About 34 kids between ages 3 and 5 visited in the morning, according to preschool teacher Carly Hines said.

During their visit, Chambon talked about fire safety, the importance of knowing their home address, how to call 911 and what to do during a fire.

The children also got a tour of the fire hall and an up-close look at the fire trucks, including the department’s 1931 Ahrens Fox, which still works, and its “big one,” a 2003 E-One ladder.

They also got a demonstration of the old Gamwell system — boxes that used to be located on utility poles around the borough that people could use to alert firefighters to a fire. They went out of service in 1975, Chambon said.

Highland Hose has 18 active volunteer firefighters, Chambon said.

“Maybe some day we’ll get a few to be firefighters for us,” he said of the children who visited. “We have to start somewhere.”

Brian C. Rittmeyer is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Brian at 724-226-4701, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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