It’s time for wine at the annual Penn’s Colony event | TribLIVE.com
Valley News Dispatch

It’s time for wine at the annual Penn’s Colony event

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop
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Stu Chandler
The annual Wine Time at the Colony is Aug.17 on the Penn’s Colony grounds, just minutes north of Pittsburgh, in Saxonburg, Clinton Township.
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Stu Chandler
The annual Wine Time at the Colony, set for Aug. 17 on the Penn’s Colony grounds in Saxonburg, Clinton Township, will feature 17 wineries.
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Stu Chandler
Food, music and an art show will be included in the annual Wine Time at the Colony on Aug. 17 on the Penn’s Colony grounds in Saxonburg, Clinton Township.
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Stu Chandler
Wineries from Pennsylvania and New York will be present at the annual Wine Time at the Colony on Aug. 17 on the Penn’s Colony grounds, just minutes north of Pittsburgh, in Saxonburg, Clinton Township.
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Stu Chandler
Many wineries return year after year to showcase their products at the annual Wine Time at the Colony, this year on Aug. 17 on the Penn’s Colony grounds, just minutes north of Pittsburgh, in Saxonburg, Clinton Township.
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Tribune-Review file
Seventeen wineries will be on hand at the annual Wine Time at the Colony is Aug. 17 on the Penn’s Colony grounds.
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Courtesy La Vigneta Winery
La Vigneta Winery of Sarver will be one of the 17 wineries at Wine Time at the Colony at the Penn’s Colony grounds in Saxonburg.
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Courtesy La Vigneta Winery
La Vigneta Winery of Sarver will be one of the 17 wineries at Wine Time at the Colony at the Penn’s Colony grounds in Saxonburg.

Enjoy a glass of wine on a summer day underneath a shade tree.

The annual Wine Time at the Colony, set for 1-6 p.m. Aug. 17 at the Penn’s Colony grounds in Saxonburg, Clinton Township, will feature vinos from Pennsylvania and New York.

The annual event had previously been held the first Saturday after Labor Day.

“While the 17 wineries are from Pennsylvania and New York, the influence of winemakers from Chile, Italy, Spain and California is prominent, as grapes from these regions are used in the handcrafted wines brought to the event,” says co-organizer Beth Ann Rush. “This offers a balance of traditional and dry wines with the fruit and seasonal vintages customary of the New York and Pennsylvania growing regions.”

Loyal participants

There are many wineries that participate year after year after year, including Greenhouse Winery in Irwin. Co-owner Greg Hazuza says they plan to bring 50-60 cases from a variety of dry red and white wines, sweet and fruit varieties, as well as the signature wines, including red hot diamond.

“It is always a really good festival for us,” says Hazuza. “It’s a wonderful opportunity to display our wines and it’s in a nice woodland setting.”

It is also a chance for guests to try new wines.

The festival has been a must-attend for Francesca Howden, co-owner of La Vigneta Winery in Sarver. She says they first met a lot of their long-time customers at this event.

“Some of our best customers have come from this festival,” Howden says. “They care about our businesses, and they want us to succeed. They’ve watched us grow. We would not be sold in some Giant Eagle stores if it wasn’t for this festival.”

She says the organizers do an amazing job and the property is beautiful, which always draws a nice crowd. She plans to bring the winery’s signature moscato.

“It’s held outside in a really nice park setting,” she says. “There will be a nice variety of good quality wines.”

Wine Time started in 2012 and Rush says organizers strive to offer a wide selection of wines that are as good as any made in California, or around the world.

“All of these wineries have mastered great collections and have outstanding wine,” says Rush. “They will all bring excellent wines to the event. It will be an amazing atmosphere.”

More than wine

The Swingtet 8 will perform original arrangements of swing era music. Featuring five horns, three rhythm players and a singer, the band recently performed an after-concert at Heinz Hall with two members of the Pittsburgh Symphony.

Small batch local foods and farm-raised meats offered by vendors will include items such as gourmet grilled cheese sandwiches with smoked turkey, aged cheddar cheese and cranberry pepper jelly. New England-style lobster rolls and grilled shrimp are recent additions to the menu.

There will be pulled pork, pulled chicken and brisket sandwiches from Smokin’ Toads BBQ in Sarver. Owner Todd Nelson says they will have their signature macaroni and cheese bowls where guests can top the cheesy dish with their choice of meat and other toppings.

“It’s a wonderful experience,” says Nelson, who has been part of several Wine Time festivals. “It’s a beautiful day of walking in the woods. There are people who come into our restaurant who say they saw us at Wine Time. This festival is right in our backyard and we enjoy being part of it.”

Customers also can bring food for outdoor, picnic-style dining.

Juried artists are included in the outdoor festival.

17 on the 17th

Here are the 17 wineries participating in Wine Time on Aug. 17:

• New York’s Johnson Estate Vineyard

• Pennsylvania’s Winery at Wilcox

• Arsenal Ciderhouse

• Allegheny Cellars

• August Falls Winery

• Courtyard Winery

• Deer Creek Winery

• Four Twelve Winery

• Greenhouse Winery

• Mazzotta Winery

• Volant Winery

• 21 Brix

• BeeKind Winery

• Groundhog Winery

• Kingview Mead

• La Vigneta

• Wapiti Ridge Winery

Admission is $25 and includes a souvenir wine glass. Designated driver admission is $5. All visitors must be over 21 with valid ID.

Details: 724-352-9922 or winetimeatthecolony.com

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact JoAnne at 724-853-5062, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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