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Pick your spot at The Lot in Oakmont for upscale modern industrial dining | TribLIVE.com
Valley News Dispatch

Pick your spot at The Lot in Oakmont for upscale modern industrial dining

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Joyce Hanz | For the Tribune-Review
The staff at The Lot: (from left) Leah Goughnour, Aaron Norris, Manager Jen San Rocco, Rodger Bertram and Geena Romeo.
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Joyce Hanz | For the Tribune-Review
Dr. Robert Quinlin, left, of O’Hara lunches with friends on April 2, 2019, at The Lot at Edgewater in Oakmont.
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Submitted
The Lot at Edgewater is a newer eatery in Oakmont.
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Joyce Hanz | For the Tribune-Review
Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, The Lot at Edgewater Belgian Waffles ($8) feature Vermont maple syrup, fresh berries ($3) and whipped butter.
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Joyce Hanz | For the Tribune-Review
Double-Cut Lamb Chop ($45) featuring greens and beans, red wine sausage reduction and mint chimichurri.
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Joyce Hanz | For the Tribune-Review
Dinner entree Double-Cut Pork Chop ($28). BBQ dusted, brown butter spatzle, charred purple cabbage and apple BBQ sauce.
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Joyce Hanz | For the Tribune-Review
Manager Jen San Rocco shows off the outdoor dining patio, complete with a fire pit, at The Lot at Edgewater in Oakmont.
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Joyce Hanz | For the Tribune-Review

There’s a lot to choose from at The Lot.

The Lot at Edgewater in Oakmont celebrated its first anniversary in February.

Patrons can lounge in a upscale cigar bar located upstairs, relax on the 1,200-square-foot outdoor patio, complete with a large gas fire pit, dine inside, mingle at the modern centerpiece bar or settle into cozy chairs in the bar/lounge area.

Serving creative American-inspired dishes for breakfast, lunch and dinner, The Lot at Edgewater is open daily beginning at 6 a.m. and each intriguing menu item offers a variety of options and price ranges ($3-$45.)

Billing itself as a new-age diner, cigar bar, drinkery and chophouse, expect an upscale dining experience with a casually elegant vibe.

Sitting on the fringe of the Edgewater housing development at 145 Allegheny Ave., the eatery is the newest addition to owner John Keefe’s restaurant portfolio in Oakmont, which includes established eateries Carnivores and The Pub at 333.

Look for busy general manager Jen San Rocco during your visit to The Lot at Edgewater.

She’s there daily, working to ensure operations are running smoothly.

“I’m dating The Lot,” she jokes.

After graduating from Penn State with a journalism degree, Oakmont native San Rocco quit her corporate ad agency job in downtown Pittsburgh for the world of restaurant management.

“We want The Lot at Edgewater to be approachable,” she says.

Keefe says the restaurant’s anniversary really is a tribute to the employees there.

“Reflecting on our one-year mark, I have to say how extremely proud I am of the staff and what they’ve accomplished. I’m lucky to have such a dedicated team as well as the support of our incredible community.”

An abundance of windows on three sides offer an almost atrium feel to the indoor dining area and modern industrial decor in cool tones of gray and blue make for a sleek and serene environment.

San Rocco and her service team are dedicated to offering outstanding customer service.

“You won’t find white table cloths here,” Rocco says. “We have an existing reputation in the town (with Carnivores and The Pub at 333) and this was a different avenue and venture for us and it’s always an interesting start, but I think, as the year as gone on, it has become an approachable and welcoming place. It’s another addition to the Oakmont community that has something for everybody.”

Get your breakfast fix daily here until 3:30 p.m.

The Belgian Waffles ($8) turn heads here. Giant powdered sugar sprinkled waffles with Vermont maple syrup and whipped butter (add fresh berries for $3) are a must-try says Rocco.

Lunch offers tricked-out sandwiches like the Reuben Pfeffer ($11), featuring house-made pastrami, swiss, Brussels sprout sauerkraut, thousand island dressing on rye bread, and the Burrata B.L.T. ($12) with bacon, kale, arugula, Duke’s mayo (a southern staple), and fried tomato on a baguette.

At 4 p.m. The Lot becomes a chop house, offering steaks with rubs, sauces and finishing butters, pastas, sandwiches, veal, lamb, and numerous seafood entrees.

Enjoy live jazz every Thursday evening and look for nightly dinner specials Mondays through Wednesdays such as Monday’s Prime Rib (12 oz. $28 or 16 oz. $32) served au jus with horseradish cream, garlic mashed potatoes and grilled asparagus.

Cigar aficionados flock upstairs to the Ionadi Room (named for Oakmont Smoke n’ Guns shop owner), where there is another large bar, a mahogany-paneled lounge area and, currently, a waiting list for cigar humidor lockers. Featured cigars are imported from countries such as Honduras, Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic.

Dr. Robert Quinlin of O’Hara Township recently met retired colleagues at The Lot for lunch.

“I have been here several times. It’s bright, open and airy — I like it,” Quinlin said.

•••

THE LOT AT EDGEWATER

Where: 145 Allegheny Ave., Oakmont

Info: Serving breakfast (6 a.m.), lunch and dinner daily. Reservations accepted.

Contact: 412-794-8545, www.Thelotatedgewater.com

The concept: A new-age diner, chophouse, drinkery and cigar bar (separate, upstairs) suitable for all. Open-air and spacious lower-level layout, complete with abundant windows.

Menu sample: For breakfast try Classic Steak and Eggs ($28) featuring a 16 oz. bone-in rib-eye, two eggs any style and crispy smashed redskins. For lunch, nosh on the Seared Shrimp Tacos ($14) served with marinated purple cabbage, diced tomato, sambol aioli, pico de gallo and blue corn tortilla. Dinner small plates include the Chilled Seafood Plate ($58), Cast-Iron Quesadilla ($14), Lobster Mac & Cheese ($21) and Crab Cakes ($32). Dinner entrees include a Double-Cut Lamb Chop ($45) served with greens and beans, a red wine sausage reduction and mint chimichurri.

Must Try: The steaks and chops. Choose from New York strip, Delmonico, center-cut rib-eye, Porterhouse or filet mignon.

The bottom line: Think upscale bistro meets steakhouse.

Joyce Hanz is a Tribune-Review contributing writer.

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