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Searching for answers, hope at Mystical Psychic Fair in New Kensington | TribLIVE.com
Valley News Dispatch

Searching for answers, hope at Mystical Psychic Fair in New Kensington

Tom Davidson
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Tom Davidson | Tribune-Review
Tarot cards are on display at a psychic’s reading table Saturday, April 20, 2019, at a Mystical Psychic Fair at the Qualiity Inn in New Kensington.
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Tom Davidson | Tribune-Review
Shelley Buhl, left, 68, of Plum, sits for a photo with psychic Ronda Mills-Ferguson, 60, of Scottdale, on Saturday, April 20, 2019, at a Mystical Psychic Fair at the Qualiity Inn in New Kensington.
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Tom Davidson | Tribune-Review
Tarot cards are on display at a psychic’s reading table Saturday, April 20, 2019, at a Mystical Psychic Fair at the Qualiity Inn in New Kensington.
1048623_web1_vnd-psychics04-042119
Tom Davidson | Tribune-Review
Ruth Lorena, 52, of South Park, who operated Enlightened Healing Energy in Castle Shannon, sits for a photo on Saturday, April 20, 2019, at a Mystical Psychic Fair at the Qualiity Inn in New Kensington.

Behold, the mystery of life: Past, present and future explained.

Some find answers through religion. Others believe it’s all coincidence. Some feel they are gifted with the power to offer explanations, and they do so using metaphysics and mystical traditions that attract people searching for answers.

Those searchers were rewarded Saturday at the Quality Inn in New Kensington, where a Mystical Psychic Fair was held.

A steady stream of people paid $5 to get in the door and more for a personal reading by a room filled with mediums, healers, gem and crystal miners, and other vendors looking to cash in on the curious.

Among them was Shelley Buhl of Plum. The 68-year-old saw the advertisement in the newspaper, had no other plans, and decided to check it out.

“It was very interesting. It gave me some insights into things that have happened in my life over the years and some things to look forward to,” Buhl said after a reading with Ronda Mills-Ferguson of Scottdale.

Mills-Ferguson, 60, is a retired teacher who worked with blind students in Somerset. Upon retirement, she pursued training as an intuitive psychic reader, something she’d been interested in all her life.

“When I was a young girl, I found my grandmother’s crystal ball in her closet and that was the beginning for me,” Mills-Ferguson said.

She’s studied with teachers from the Rhinebeck, N.Y.-based Omega Institute and enjoys practicing the craft.

“It’s just a life-changing gift for me,” Mills-Ferguson said. “I feel that I’m a healer. I feel that my readings and my mediumships, they help people. When people come to readers or psychics, they’re looking for answers and I feel through my readings I give them that. I give them hope. That’s what I aim to do.”

Buhl was pleased with the reading.

“I found it very insightful because Ronda did a few things that seemed to strike a chord with me,” Buhl said.

Another medium at the fair, Ruth Lorena of South Park, operates her a business, Enlightened Healing Energy, in Castle Shannon.

“I can feel the energy of people. I can feel their emotions. I can feel their loved ones and what’s going on with them,” Lorena, 52, said. “I just enjoy helping people and giving them healing energy.”

Tom Davidson is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Tom at 724-226-4715, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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