Strap on your head lamp and ‘Race To The Moon’ along Kiski River | TribLIVE.com
Valley News Dispatch

Strap on your head lamp and ‘Race To The Moon’ along Kiski River

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop
1363284_web1_VND-LIV-MOONRUN-5
Courtesy Ken Kaminski
The seventh annual Roaring Run Race To The Moon 5K Run/Walk is at 9 p.m. on July 13.
1363284_web1_VND-LIV-MOONRUN-2-070719
Courtesy Ken Kaminski
The seventh annual Roaring Run Race To The Moon 5K Run/Walk is at 9 p.m. on July 13.
1363284_web1_VND-LIV-MOONRUN-3
Courtesy Ken Kaminski
The seventh annual Roaring Run Race To The Moon 5K Run/Walk is at 9 p.m. on July 13.
1363284_web1_VND-LIV-MOONRUN-4
Courtesy Ken Kaminski
The seventh annual Roaring Run Race To The Moon 5K Run/Walk is at 9 p.m. on July 13.
1363284_web1_VND-LIV-MOONRUN-HELMET
Courtesy Ken Kaminski
The seventh annual Roaring Run Race To The Moon 5K Run/Walk is at 9 p.m. July 13. This runner at a past race wore an astronaut’s helmet to get in the spirit.

Roaring Run Watershed closes at dusk, but not on July 13.

On this day, the darkness is when things get going.

The seventh annual Roaring Run Race To The Moon 5K Run/Walk begins at 9 p.m. Held along the Kiski River in Apollo, it is a major fundraiser for the Roaring Run Watershed Association.

“It is a unique event because the run/walk doesn’t go off until the sun goes down,” says race director Ken Kaminski of Allegheny Township, who is also president of Roaring Run Watershed Association. “Ever want to run or walk the trails and through the woods at night? Well, here is your chance.”

History lesson

The Roaring Run Trail follows the Kiski River upstream for 5 miles and ends at the village of Edmon. The first 4 miles are built on the former railroad grade using crushed limestone, according to its website. The final mile has significant grade changes and has a tar-and-chip surface. It is part of Trans Allegheny Trails.

The ultimate goal of the Trans Allegheny Trails’ operators is to connect as many trails as possible into a continuous system. The Roaring Run Watershed Association was formed in 1983 as a nonprofit environmental preservation organization.

The Roaring Run Watershed encompasses 653 acres of rails to trails. It’s open to the public every day from dawn to dusk. The recent heavy rains have caused some damage, with muddy trails and tree branches and other debris, but not enough to halt the race, Kaminski says.

Light the way

Because it takes place at night, there will be luminaries and tiki torches along the course to help guide participants, who must also wear or carry a light. Part of the route includes crossing a bridge. It is a flat, out-and-back course.

There will be trophies for the first three male and female finishers as well as pizza, water, cookies and watermelon at the end.

What’s in a name?

The event got its name because it is held in Apollo, on or near, the anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing on July 20, 1969. So don’t be surprised if you see someone wearing an astronaut’s helmet.

“Enjoy a run or walk at night along the river,” Kaminski says. “It’s a really good time and we will be really happy if there is a full moon that night.”

Details: roaringrun.org; cost is $30, $25 in advance; parking is at 310 Clifford Ave., Apollo, where participants and spectators will be bused to the trail.

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact JoAnne at 412-320-7889, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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