World-renowned violinist, daughter to perform at Tarentum church | TribLIVE.com
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World-renowned violinist, daughter to perform at Tarentum church

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop
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JoAnne Klimovich Harrop | Tribune-Review
World-renowned violinist Andres Cardenes (left) rehearses with his daughter Isabela inside his studio at Carnegie Mellon University. The two will perform Sunday, Oct. 20, at Central Presbyterian Church in Tarentum.
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JoAnne Klimovich Harrop | Tribune-Review
World-renowned violinist Andres Cardenes (left) rehearses with his daughter Isabela inside his studio at Carnegie Mellon University. The two will perform Sunday, Oct. 20, at Central Presbyterian Church in Tarentum.
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Courtesy of Isabel Cardenes
Isabel Cardenes, who plays the harp, will perform with her father Andres Cardenes on Sunday, Oct. 20, at Central Presbyterian Church in Tarentum.
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Courtesy of Andres Cardenes
World-renowned violinist Andres Cardenes will peform with his daughter Isabela, who plays the harp, on Sunday, Oct. 20, at Central Presbyterian Church in Tarentum.
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Courtesy of Warren Davidson
The Academy Chamber Ensemble includes Warren Davidson on violin. Davidson and the Academy Chamber Ensemble will perform on March 17 at Central Presbyterian Church in Tarentum.

Violinist Andres Cardenes has performed all over the world with talented musicians.

But he said the 16-year-old girl with whom he will perform Sunday in Tarentum tops them all.

“Getting to perform with my daughter is number one,” Cardenes, the distinguished professor of violin studies at Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Music, said from his office before a rehearsal with his daughter, Isabel.

“Playing with her is my ultimate thrill. It’s the best feeling in the world,” Cardenes said.

Cardenes, of Shadyside, has appeared as a soloist with more than 100 orchestras on four continents, including ones in Pittsburgh, Los Angeles, St. Louis, Philadelphia, Moscow, Shanghai and Barcelona. He has collaborated with some of the world’s greatest conductors, such as Lorin Maazel, Charles Dutoit, Sir Andre Previn and Manfred Honeck.

On Sunday, he will perform in “Variations on a Harp” at Tarentum’s Central Presbyterian Church.

The free concert, scheduled to start at 4 p.m., will feature music by Handel, Bach and Faure.

Cardenes will play violin while his daughter plays the harp. Warren Davidson, a Slippery Rock University music instructor who conducts the school’s orchestra, will be on the viola.

Andres and Isabel Cardenes discussed one of the pieces they will play at the concert during their rehearsal Wednesday.

“I don’t get a lot of time with him musically, so when I do get the opportunity I really want to,” she said. “It is such a personal connection to play music with your dad. We work so hard in rehearsals to make it happen.”

Isabel Cardenes is “tough as nails,” according to her father. He said she practices every morning at 6:30 a.m. before going to Oakland Catholic High School in Pittsburgh.

Andres Cardenes said he has enjoyed seeing his daughter grow as a musician. She began playing the piano at age 5 and the harp at 10.

Music is in her blood.

The Cuban-born Andres Cardenes said he knew at the age of 9 the violin would be his life’s work. He has been playing musical instruments since he was 5.

Davidson invited the father-daughter duo to be part of the concert, which kicks off the sixth season of The Concert Series.

“Warren is so connected in the music scene and he does such a wonderful job putting this series together, and to have someone as talented at Andres Cardenes and his daughter playing at our church is amazing,” said Dave Rankin of Harrison, a lifelong member of the church who is handling publicity for the concert.

Andres Cardenes said there is “nothing else like live music. It’s all about the experience of hearing a concert live, sitting with other people and sharing in it. It’s living in the moment.”

Details: 724-224-9220 or https://www.facebook.com/CentralPresbyterianChurchTarentum

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact JoAnne at 412-320-7889, [email protected]web.com or via Twitter .

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