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Valley News Dispatch

Spinning studio at Pittsburgh Mills to help meet resolutions

Emily Balser
| Friday, Dec. 29, 2017, 5:24 p.m.

Residents looking for a place to kick-start their weight loss resolution in 2018 will have a brand new spinning studio to go to at the Pittsburgh Mills mall.

New Kensington resident Laurens Johnson is opening the studio, called Extreme Health Consultant LLC, on New Year's Day. It's located in the former Lids store, 409 Pittsburgh Mills Circle.

“I think I can help a lot of people,” Johnson said.

The studio will offer three levels of class: beginner, intermediate and hip-hop.

He will also offer a cycling cardio class with weights, two-hour boot camp class and personal sessions.

Prices range from $5 to $20 per class.

Johnson, who also works as an operations manager with U.S. Steel, has been teaching spinning classes at other studios since around 2004. He decided to take the leap and open his own studio with the hope of eventually expanding.

“I've always had a passion and a drive to work out,” he said. “When cycling was introduced to me, I fell in love with it.”

Johnson said he is a certified spinning instruction through Mad Dogg Athletics. He suggests consulting with a doctor before trying a class to make sure it's the right fit.

Classes are limited to six people per class. People interested in participating can e-mail info@extremehealthconsultantllc.com to reserve their spot.

He said classes can be taken by beginners who are just looking to get in shape or by more experienced athletes because everyone goes at their own pace.

“I always set the bar up here at a five,” he said. “You start a one; that way you have something to work toward — it's a goal.”

Johnson said he chose the mall for his studio because of its location and the safe environment.

“People feel welcome in a mall setting,” he said.

He said his classes are designed for people of all fitness levels, but they are especially ideal for people who need low-impact exercise, are suffering from arthritis or recovering from an injury or surgery.

“That's what it's about — it's about catering to everyone,” he said.

Request for comment from mall management on the new business was not returned.

Emily Balser is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-226-4680, emilybalser@tribweb.com or on Twitter @emilybalser.

New Kensington resident Laurens Johnson demonstrates how his bike works at his new spinning studio, Extreme Health Consultant LLC, at the Pittsburgh Mills mall on Thursday, Dec. 29, 2017.
Emily Balser | Tribune-Review
New Kensington resident Laurens Johnson demonstrates how his bike works at his new spinning studio, Extreme Health Consultant LLC, at the Pittsburgh Mills mall on Thursday, Dec. 29, 2017.
New Kensington resident Laurens Johnson brings his bike to his new spinning studio, Extreme Health Consultant LLC, at the Pittsburgh Mills mall on Thursday, Dec. 29, 2017.
Emily Balser | Tribune-Review
New Kensington resident Laurens Johnson brings his bike to his new spinning studio, Extreme Health Consultant LLC, at the Pittsburgh Mills mall on Thursday, Dec. 29, 2017.
New Kensington resident Laurens Johnson sets up his bike at his new spinning studio, Extreme Health Consultant LLC, at the Pittsburgh Mills mall on Thursday, Dec. 29, 2017.
Emily Balser | Tribune-Review
New Kensington resident Laurens Johnson sets up his bike at his new spinning studio, Extreme Health Consultant LLC, at the Pittsburgh Mills mall on Thursday, Dec. 29, 2017.
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