ShareThis Page
Valley News Dispatch

New Kensington continues steady fight to eliminate housing blight

| Monday, July 9, 2018, 12:24 a.m.
1261-1263 Kenneth Ave., New Kensington
Louis B. Ruediger | Tribune-Review
1261-1263 Kenneth Ave., New Kensington
1223 Victoria Ave., New Kensington
Louis B. Ruediger | Tribune-Review
1223 Victoria Ave., New Kensington
1123 Woodmont Ave., New Kensington
Louis B. Ruediger | Tribune-Review
1123 Woodmont Ave., New Kensington
513 Linden Ave., New Kensington
Louis B. Ruediger | Tribune-Review
513 Linden Ave., New Kensington
359 Main St., New Kensington
Louis B. Ruediger | Tribune-Review
359 Main St., New Kensington

The fight against blight in New Kensington continues.

Last week, the redevelopment authority awarded a contract to Pittsburgh-based Jadel Minniefield Construction Services to bring down five more dilapidated structures.

Scheduled for demolition are 1261-1263 Kenneth Ave., 1223 Victoria Ave., 359 Main St., 513 Linden Ave. and 1123 Woodmont Ave.

According to redevelopment authority Executive Director Sarah Snider, removing those buildings is a priority for the city.

“Those are all really far gone, and they started to become a danger,” she said. “These are all city owned properties that they wanted to get cleaned up.”

The cost of the demolition, $65,000, is being covered by federal Community Development Block Grants.

Exactly when the buildings will come down is still up in the air.

Snider said there were actually eight properties up for demolition but that the other three — 523 Earl Ave., 215 Ninth St. and 1207 Victoria Ave. — will have to wait for another bidding process, as the paperwork to approve their destruction is still working its way through the state.

“There is a lot of good stuff happening — but it's a work in progress,” she said.

In addition to the eight properties the city has asked the authority to raze, Snider said that the code enforcement office continues to identify other properties, and property owners, that will require attention.

Officials say New Kensington currently has 64 properties on its demolition list.

While exactly what will happen to the lots once the buildings are gone is still undecided, Snider said all of it is just the beginning.

“With the acquisition of the Schreiber Industrial Park, the Corridor of Innovation, a lot is happening,” she said. “We're going to see many sparks like that.”

Matthew Medsger is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 724-226-4675, mmedsger@tribweb.com or via Twitter @matthew_medsger.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me