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Valley News Dispatch

Five facing charges in Gilpin dog abuse case

Chuck Biedka
| Wednesday, July 11, 2018, 9:36 a.m.

Five people are facing charges after, police say, they found two dogs neglected in the dirt floor basement of a Gilpin home.

Gilpin Patrolman Jordan Schrecengost said there was little water for the dogs and the water he could see didn’t appear clean.

According to an arrest report, neither dog had bedding on the earthen floor.

The dogs were chained and the basement of the Ice Pond Road home was littered with garbage, trash and enough dog feces for police to conclude it was accumulated from multiple days, according to police reports.

The two pit bull terrier mix dogs were allegedly greatly under weight. One was losing hair on its back and the other had lost most of the hair on its hind quarters, police said.

Police are charging the dogs’ owner, Colleen Diane Moore, 50, formerly of Ice Pound Road, who, police say, visited the house daily; Jane Ann Mcelroy,42, and her husband, Robert Dale Mcelroy, 47, who live in the house where the dogs were found; and two women, Brandy Silvis, 33, of the same Ice Pond Road address; and Myranda E. Lenhart, 22, of West Seventh Avenue, Tarentum, who allegedly had responsibility of taking care of the dogs.

Moore is charged with three counts of animal neglect, including not getting veterinarian care, animal cruelty and not having the required dog licenses. The Mcelroys, Silvis and Lenhart all face animal neglect charges.

Becky Morrow, a local veterinarian, said the dogs have chronic skin infections.

“They were extremely itchy and uncomfortable,” she said. “Both dogs are gaining weight and their skin infections are being treated,” she said.

She both dogs are “very affectionate, very sweet dogs.”

Police said four dogs found living in the upstairs portion of the home appeared to be in good condition.

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