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Valley News Dispatch

Harmar, PennDOT come to terms on pavement crushing site off of Route 28 Exit 11

Emily Balser
| Thursday, Oct. 11, 2018, 2:33 p.m.
PennDOT and Harmar officials reached an agreement in which the state will seek permits for its rock crushing operation near Routes 28 and 910 and will reduce the amount of material stored there.
Louis B. Ruediger | Tribune-Review
PennDOT and Harmar officials reached an agreement in which the state will seek permits for its rock crushing operation near Routes 28 and 910 and will reduce the amount of material stored there.
PennDOT told Harmar officials it would cut down on the amount of old pavement it stockpiles at a rock crushing facility along Route 28 near the Route 910 interchange.
PennDOT told Harmar officials it would cut down on the amount of old pavement it stockpiles at a rock crushing facility along Route 28 near the Route 910 interchange.

Harmar and PennDOT have reached an agreement over a dump site along Route 28 that is being used to store and crush discarded pavement.

The location, which lies in a highly visible area between the Route 28 southbound on-ramp (Exit 11) to the highway and Route 910, is used to store and crush old concrete often used to fix landslides in the area.

Local officials were concerned about the appearance and environmental impact of the roughly 3-acre site, but it appears a July meeting between local and state officials was successful.

“We are pleased to say that we believe we’ve come to a meeting of the minds on this matter,” Harmar Supervisor Bob Seibert said. “We have the best compromise that’s currently available to us.”

Harmar officials were concerned about the site because it has gotten bigger over the years and changed the topography of the area.

PennDOT spokesman Steve Cowan said they are seeking two environmental permits for the site — one for water quality and runoff and one for processing construction and demolition waste for recycling.

PennDOT officials previously said they likely wouldn’t need permits because the location is in a state right of way. But after July’s meeting, officials reviewed what’s legally required of them.

In addition to the permits, PennDOT plans to plant trees to improve the appearance and provide some privacy to the area.

“The planting plan will be conifers around sections of the perimeter that have the most exposure from the traveling public,” Cowan said.

Cowan said crews will begin crushing the concrete that’s at the site beginning Oct. 18 and hopes to have it finished by November. However, it will take longer to haul it out of the site.

PennDOT also installed gates around the site and posted “no trespassing” signs to improve safety.

“I do think they are going to be good neighbors going forward,” Seibert said. “We did our job, and it took some time and effort, but the results were well worth the effort.”

Emily Balser is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Emily at 724-226-4680, emilybalser@tribweb.com or via Twitter @emilybalser.

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