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St. Vincent College students make chemistry Christmas trees

Joe Napsha
| Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016, 11:00 p.m.
Lab Manager Beth Bollinger, left, hands a first-place wreath to advanced chemical methods students, from left, Nicole George, Hannah Hosack and Connor McCormick for their 'Chemis-tree' display of glassware filled with food coloring-dyed water in a classroom in the Sis and Herman Dupre Science Pavilion at St. Vincent College in Latrobe on Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016.
Christian Tyler Randolph | Tribune-Review
Lab Manager Beth Bollinger, left, hands a first-place wreath to advanced chemical methods students, from left, Nicole George, Hannah Hosack and Connor McCormick for their 'Chemis-tree' display of glassware filled with food coloring-dyed water in a classroom in the Sis and Herman Dupre Science Pavilion at St. Vincent College in Latrobe on Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016.
Connor McCormick hangs a first-place wreath in front of his team's 'Chemis-tree' holiday display of glassware filled with food coloring-dyed water in a classroom in the Sis and Herman Dupre Science Pavilion at St. Vincent College in Latrobe on Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016.
Christian Tyler Randolph | Tribune-Review
Connor McCormick hangs a first-place wreath in front of his team's 'Chemis-tree' holiday display of glassware filled with food coloring-dyed water in a classroom in the Sis and Herman Dupre Science Pavilion at St. Vincent College in Latrobe on Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016.
Glassware filled with food coloring-dyed water hangs in a 'Chemistree' display in a classroom in the Sis and Herman Dupre Science Pavilion at St. Vincent College in Latrobe on Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016.
Christian Tyler Randolph | Tribune-Review
Glassware filled with food coloring-dyed water hangs in a 'Chemistree' display in a classroom in the Sis and Herman Dupre Science Pavilion at St. Vincent College in Latrobe on Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016.
Lab work continues on the other side of a classroom from the space set aside for a small group of 'Chemistree' displays in a classroom in the Sis and Herman Dupre Science Pavilion at St. Vincent College in Latrobe on Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016.
Christian Tyler Randolph | Tribune-Review
Lab work continues on the other side of a classroom from the space set aside for a small group of 'Chemistree' displays in a classroom in the Sis and Herman Dupre Science Pavilion at St. Vincent College in Latrobe on Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016.
The first-place 'Chemis-tree' display created by a group of students using holiday decorations and glassware filled with food coloring-dyed water in a classroom in the Sis and Herman Dupre Science Pavilion at St. Vincent College in Latrobe on Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016.
Christian Tyler Randolph | Tribune-Review
The first-place 'Chemis-tree' display created by a group of students using holiday decorations and glassware filled with food coloring-dyed water in a classroom in the Sis and Herman Dupre Science Pavilion at St. Vincent College in Latrobe on Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016.

A group of St. Vincent College chemistry students on Thursday used beakers and test tubes filled with red and green dyed water to create “chemis-trees” in a laboratory at the Sis and Herman Dupre Science Pavilion on the Unity campus.

About a dozen chemistry students created three chemis-trees, using a metal stand with a base, then attaching the “ornaments” to clamps that were placed on a vertical metal pole of about 18 inches. They added strings of lights and garland to top off their creations.

Some students wanted to create an actual chemical experiment inside the beakers instead of using water with food coloring, but lab manager Beth Bollinger nixed the idea.

Students said the project was a welcome diversion from their usual chemistry projects.

“Hopefully, it catches on next year,” Bollinger said.

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