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Cindy Hosack's four decades with Greensburg Police coming to an end

Jacob Tierney
| Tuesday, Oct. 17, 2017, 11:00 p.m.
Cindy Hosack, 63, of Unity Township, an administrative assistant for the Greensburg Police Department, poses for a portrait at her desk. Hosack will retire at the end of the month after more than 38 years of processing police reports and preparing files for hearings.
Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Cindy Hosack, 63, of Unity Township, an administrative assistant for the Greensburg Police Department, poses for a portrait at her desk. Hosack will retire at the end of the month after more than 38 years of processing police reports and preparing files for hearings.

There are few people alive more immersed in the history of the Greensburg Police Department than Cindy Hosack.

Hosack, 63, has worked at the department for 38 years, serving as an administrative assistant under seven police chiefs and six mayors.

She will retire Oct. 27.

“She's always been super dedicated to her job. She takes it personally, she's really thorough and makes sure everything is done correctly and on time,” said police Chief Chad Zucco.

Hosack got her start writing parking tickets in 1979 but was quickly promoted to secretary to Chief Nicholas Ficco .

“When we wrote the tickets, we had a big log book, and we wrote each ticket down that they did, and when they would pay them we had to go back in and log it,” she said.

She became a department fixture in the decades that followed. Chiefs and officers came and went, but Hosack stayed a constant.

“I think what kept me here is every day something's different. Every day a different incident, a different arrest. And you have to think, it's like a puzzle,” she said.

Every case the department handles crosses Hosack's desk, where she compiles incident reports. And though she usually found the work engaging, occasionally it could take its toll.

Her job gave her a front-row seat to the city's most brutal crimes, and the worst of them could leave her shaken, she said.

“I think some of the incidents would get to me. Things like child abuse,” she said.

Perhaps the worst was the “Greensburg Six” torture-killing of a mentally disabled woman in 2010, she said.

But there were plenty of moments of joy as well. Hosack remembers early in her career celebrating the birth of officer Henry Fontana's son. Henry Fontana Jr. now is a Greensburg police officer.

When she was hired, Robert Bell was mayor. Now his son, also named Robert Bell , holds the position.

“She's seen whole generations come through, and she's still sticking to it,” Zucco said.

Hosack said she plans to spend retirement traveling with her husband, Harry Hosack.

Jacob Tierney is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 724-836-6646, jtierney@tribweb.com or via Twitter @Soolseem.

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