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Westmoreland

Newborn's dad sold heroin in maternity ward of Greensburg hospital, police say

Paul Peirce
| Friday, Oct. 20, 2017, 11:18 a.m.
Cody R. Hulse, 25, of Latrobe, is accused of selling heroin in the maternity ward at Excela Health Westmoreland Hospital.
Paul Pierce | Tribune-Review
Cody R. Hulse, 25, of Latrobe, is accused of selling heroin in the maternity ward at Excela Health Westmoreland Hospital.
Cody R. Hulse, 25, of Latrobe, is accused of selling heroin in the maternity ward at Excela Health Westmoreland Hospital. (Trib photo)
Paul Peirce | Tribune-Review
Cody R. Hulse, 25, of Latrobe, is accused of selling heroin in the maternity ward at Excela Health Westmoreland Hospital. (Trib photo)

The father of a newborn baby girl was charged with selling heroin in the maternity ward at Excela Health Westmoreland hospital, just feet away from the infant.

Cody R. Hulse, 25, of Latrobe was arraigned Friday on charges of possession of heroin, possession and delivery of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia and endangering the welfare of children filed by Greensburg police.

When officers confronted Hulse in his girlfriend's room Thursday just hours after the baby's birth, he admitted selling heroin to people who visited him in the Greensburg hospital, according to the affidavit filed by Detective Sgt. John Swank. Police confiscated 34 stamp bags of heroin, four empty stamp bags and multiple hypodermic needles Hulse was carrying, police said.

“This affidavit says you had needles in there, you were selling drugs in there ... all with a newborn baby in the room. This is very disturbing,” District Judge James Albert told the handcuffed and shackled Hulse.

“I have an issue myself with drugs ... heroin. I really didn't want to bring it in,” Hulse said.

As Albert contemplated the amount of bond, Hulse asked him to consider that he is a new father and has a full-time job at a lumber company.

When Albert set bond at $100,000 cash, Hulse lowered his head and muttered, “This is ridiculous.”

Officers were led to Hulse after a traffic stop on North Main Street in Greensburg at 6:51 p.m. Thursday, where people “had drug paraphernalia in plain view on the front seat,” Swank wrote.

The officer found several stamp bags of heroin labeled “Final Call” in a cigarette case in the center console.

The people in the traffic stop, who have not been charged, told Swank they had just purchased the heroin in the hospital maternity ward from a man named Cody.

Swank and other officers went to the hospital, phoning nurses ahead of time to take the baby from the room before they arrived. Swank said in court documents that he and the other officers went into the room and placed Hulse under arrest.

“Hulse admitted he had heroin in his pocket and had delivered heroin to several persons who had visited the room,” Swank wrote in court papers.

Swank said Hulse's girlfriend, the mother of his child, maintained that she did not know he was selling drugs from the room.

Albert ordered that Hulse be held in the county prison and have no contact with the baby.

Hulse declined comment as he was led from Albert's office.

Paul Peirce is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 724-850-2860, ppeirce@tribweb.com or via Twitter @ppeirce_trib

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