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Seton Hill to honor Martin Luther King Jr. on Feb. 1

Stephen Huba
| Thursday, Jan. 25, 2018, 11:39 a.m.
Saoudatou Dia (left) and her daughter Aminah visit the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C., on Martin Luther King Jr. Day on Jan.15. King would have been 88 years old this year. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
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Saoudatou Dia (left) and her daughter Aminah visit the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C., on Martin Luther King Jr. Day on Jan.15. King would have been 88 years old this year. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Acceptance of social injustice will be the theme of Seton Hill University's annual Education Day in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s legacy.

Because classes did not begin until after Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the event for the student body was scheduled for 11:10 a.m. Thursday at Cecilian Hall on the second floor of the Administration Building.

Guest speaker is retired Pennsylvania state trooper and writer Kevin D. Mosley, of West Mifflin.

The theme for this year's event focuses on King's quote, “He who passively accepts evil is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it. He who accepts evil without protesting against it is really cooperating with it.”

Mosley will share his experiences visiting the historic sites of various civil rights milestones and will lead an audience discussion.

Students from Seton Hill's theater and dance and political science departments also will offer a presentation incorporating “themes of civil engagement and protest.”

In addition to the education program, the Seton Hill community will participate in Take the Day On, a day of community service in honor of King on Feb. 3.

Stephen Huba is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 724-850-1280, shuba@tribweb.com or via Twitter @shuba_trib.

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