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Pavilion going up at Sewickley Creek watershed site in Lowber

Joe Napsha
| Wednesday, June 20, 2018, 11:00 p.m.
A crew from Rock Steady Builders of Wilmont, Ohio, builds a pavilion at the Sewickley Creek Watershed Association mine drainage treatment site along Lowber Road on Tuesday, June 19, 2018.
Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
A crew from Rock Steady Builders of Wilmont, Ohio, builds a pavilion at the Sewickley Creek Watershed Association mine drainage treatment site along Lowber Road on Tuesday, June 19, 2018.
A crew from Rock Steady Builders of Wilmont, Ohio, builds a pavilion at the Sewickley Creek Water Association mine drainage treatment site along Lowber Road on Tuesday, June 19, 2018.
Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
A crew from Rock Steady Builders of Wilmont, Ohio, builds a pavilion at the Sewickley Creek Water Association mine drainage treatment site along Lowber Road on Tuesday, June 19, 2018.

Students who test water samples at the mine drainage treatment system in Lowber will be able to work now that an open-air pavilion has been added to the site.

A construction crew from Rock Steady Builders of Wilmot, Ohio, this week built a 24-by-40-foot wooden pavilion in the parking lot adjacent to the series of settling ponds and constructed wetlands that is operated by the Sewickley Creek Watershed Association. The ponds are part of the passive treatment system that captures and recovers iron oxide from the water that spews out of the abandoned Marchand mine before it flows into Sewickley Creek.

Tom Keller, watershed association executive director, had estimated the cost of the project to be about $15,000, once a foundation is poured atop the gravel floor.

The watershed association plans to add picnic benches at the site and pour a concrete floor in the second phase of the project, said Joseph Bleehash, a landscape architect and watershed association board member overseeing the project. There is no electricity at the site, Bleehash said.

The association will host a Cruise for Conservation benefit from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at the Donohoe Center in Hempfield.

Proceeds will help support several upcoming projects being undertaken by the association, including the pavilion.

For cruise participants, the cost is $5 per vehicle, with dash plaques going to the first 100 cars. The day will include door prizes, a silent auction, 50/50 raffle and a DJ playing oldies music.

The cruise will include special displays of a 1956 Mack truck and an 1800s Studebaker Wagon.

The association also plans a family field day at the Lowber site Aug. 4.

Joe Napsha is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 724-836-5252 or jnapsha@tribweb.com.

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