5 things to do in Westmoreland: Nov. 15-17 | TribLIVE.com
Westmoreland

5 things to do in Westmoreland: Nov. 15-17

Mary Pickels
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Kim Stepinsky | for the Tribune-Review
Bradford Lawrence, of Philadelphia, representing Old Overholt whiskey, Jessica Kadie-Barclay, executive director of West Overton Museums, Stephen Jamieson, of Pittsburgh, representing Old Overholt whiskey, and Sam Komlenic, board member and Pennsylvania whiskey historian, gather for a photo during last year’s Whiskey Smash, held at the West Overton Village and Museums. This year’s event is Nov. 16.

We’ve finally made it to Friday and can finally have a little fun. There’s lots going around the county this weekend.

Here are a few suggestions:

Krenn warms up the Lamp with laughs

Known for years as part of Pittsburgh’s morning drive team WDVE-FM, comedian Jim Krenn remains a popular hometown stand-up comedian.

He will bring his own style of laughs to Irwin’s Lamp Theatre, 222 Main St., for an 8 p.m. Nov. 15 show.

Tickets are $25.

Details: 724-367-4000 or lamptheatre.org

Sha Na Na drops in for Palace doo wop

For more than five decades, Sha Na Na has established a reputation for bringing “feel good” music to audiences all over the world.

The band first shook the musical scene by taking the stage at Woodstock right before Jimi Hendrix’s electric performance.

They continued to influence the American music scene through the “Sha Na Na TV Show” and their work on the film “Grease.”

Among its most popular and well-known songs are “Get a Job,” “Rock N’ Roll is Here To Stay” and “At the Hop.”

The band will perform at The Palace Theatre, 21 W. Otterman St., Greensburg, at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 16.

Tickets are $24, $34, $40 and $56.

Details: 724-836-8000 or palacetheatre.org

Cheers! Whiskey Smash returns

Always a popular event, and typically a sell out, West Overton Village and Museums will hold its fifth annual Whiskey Smash, celebrating local distilleries and the popularity of craft whiskey and distilled products.

The fundraiser helps to ensure the historical site in East Huntingdon can continue ongoing preservation and interpretation efforts.

The fun will start to “pour” at 6 p.m. Nov. 16 and includes light fare, desserts, cocktails and live music.

VIP tickets are $75 and include early entry at 5 p.m. and a limited edition tasting glass sponsored by the Pennsylvania Distiller’s Guild. General admission tickets are $50, with doors opening at 6 p.m.

Details: 724-887-7910 or westoverton village.org

Enjoy a candlelight harvest at Compass Inn

The Compass Inn Museum continues its tradition with Saturday harvest events each November.

Guests can enjoy the historic inn’s rustic charm, now adorned with natural autumn accents, cheery glowing wood fires, and the flickering of candles in every room.

Visitors will experience the difficult, but fulfilling, life of the Armors, take a guided tour of the 1820s cookhouse and step back in time with the museum’s masters of open hearth and beehive oven cookery.

At tour’s end, relax by the warm crackling fire glowing in the 1862 Room’s Rumford fireplace. Enjoy the centuries-old Thanksgiving observations, as they evolved from a combination of giving thanks for a bountiful harvest and the Puritan religious traditions to the family and community holiday celebrated today.

Tours will be held from 3 to 7 p.m. on Nov. 16 and Nov. 23.

Cost is $8 for ages 6-17, $10 for those 18-61, and $9 for age 62 and up.

Details: 724-238-4983 or email Amanda Seim at [email protected]

Penn-Trafford Drama Guild tackles political satire

High school students will take on a plot of a tiny fictitious country starting a phony war with the United States, all in the hopes the Americans will then finance the smaller nation’s rebuilding efforts.

The Penn-Trafford Drama Guild will stage the political head scratcher “The Mouse That Roared” at 3 p.m. Nov. 16 and 17, and at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 16 at the Penn Township high school.

Adapted from a 1955 Leonard Wibberley novel, the story has been told in a 1959 film starring Peter Sellers and became a stage adaptation in 1963.

Tickets are $6 at the door.

Details: pthsdramaguild.com

Mary Pickels is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Mary at 724-836-5401, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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