Annual reenactment of Battle of Bushy Run underway in Penn Township | TribLIVE.com
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Annual reenactment of Battle of Bushy Run underway in Penn Township

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Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Re-enactors portraying British forces fire musket volleys while conducting an interpretation of the Battle of Bushy Run on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019 during the 256th Anniversary of the Battle of Bushy Run Battlefield in Penn Township.
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Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Native American re-enactor Tom Hinkelman of New Jersey fires a volley of black powder during the 256th Anniversary of the Battle of Bushy Run on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019 at Bushy Run Battlefield in Penn Township. Volunteer re-enactors portrayed British and Native American forces for visitors as they interpreted the events 256 years ago.
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Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
A shaft of sunlight beams down through the forest canopy upon re-enactor Mark Somers of Robinson, Indiana County, on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019 at Bushy Run Battlefield in Penn Township as he walks off the battlefield for the 256th Anniversary of the Battle of Bushy Run.
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Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Actors portraying British soldiers and rangers wait to partake in the re-enactment during the 256th Anniversary of the Battle of Bushy Run on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019 at Bushy Run Battlefield in Penn Township.
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Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
A young re-enactor waits for the battle to begin with spectators during the 256th Anniversary of the Battle of Bushy Run on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019 at Bushy Run Battlefield in Penn Township.
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Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Re-enactors portraying Native American forces are scattered among the trees and clouds of gun smoke during the 256th Anniversary of the Battle of Bushy Run on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019 at Bushy Run Battlefield in Penn Township.
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Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Julian Stys-Ciccone, 11, of McKees Rocks watches with family as the 256th Anniversary of the Battle of Bushy Run is re-enacted on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019 at Bushy Run Battlefield in Penn Township.
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Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Jim Harland of Pittsburgh, who was portraying the pipe major of the Royal 42nd Regiment, rests on a log between battle re-enactments during the 256th Anniversary of the Battle of Bushy Run on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019 at Bushy Run Battlefield in Penn Township.

The Bushy Run Battlefield Heritage Society on Saturday hosted the first of two days commemorating the 256th anniversary of the Battle of Bushy Run.

The battle between the British and the confederation of Native Americans on the Penn Township battlefield took place Aug. 5 to 6, 1763.

Activities continue Sunday with a public church service, musical performance and fashion show. Guests can view military camps, a Native American village, refugee camp and sutler trade area. A children’s area and concession stand will be available.

The second-day battle reenactment begins at 2 p.m.

The annual event will run from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. Tickets cost $10, or $5 for children. Admission is free for children younger than 3.

The British victory by Col. Henry Bouquet was the critical turning point in Pontiac’s War, which was a series of Native American attacks on British outposts coordinated by the Ottawa chief Pontiac. It prevented the capture of Fort Pitt and restored lines of communication between the frontier and eastern settlements.

The battlefield is located at 1253 Bushy Run Road (Route 993), Penn Township.

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