Hempfield church .5K fundraiser aims for ‘all gain, no pain’ | TribLIVE.com
Westmoreland

Hempfield church .5K fundraiser aims for ‘all gain, no pain’

Stephen Huba
1173604_web1_gtr-HalfK-051919
Stephen Huba | Tribune-Review
The starting line of the Greensburg Alliance Church .5K race on Saturday.
1173604_web1_gtr-HalfK2-051919
Stephen Huba | Tribune-Review
Everybody who participated in the Greensburg Alliance Church .5K race got a medal.
1173604_web1_gtr-HalfK3-051919
Stephen Huba | Tribune-Review
The theme of the .5K race was "All Gain and No Pain."

No training? No problem.

The Greensburg Alliance Church in Hempfield held a race Saturday that was a twist on the traditional 5K — a .5K that required not even the equivalent of two laps around a regulation track.

The theme of the day was “All Gain and No Pain.”

“It’s a little bit of a twist on a common event that you see a lot,” student ministries pastor Rigel Holmes said.

About 70 people registered for the second annual event — a fundraiser for the 38 high school students from the church who are attending the LIFE 2019 Conference in Orlando in July. The triennial conference is the main national youth conference of the Christian and Missionary Alliance, an evangelical Protestant denomination with about 500,000 members in the United States.

“With an event that big, it costs a decent amount of money, so we do a number of fundraisers to help out families throughout the year,” Holmes said. “This is probably one of the most fun fundraisers that we do.”

“We just wanted to do something that everybody could do, so we came up with a .5K,” said Pastor James “Lou” Llewellyn, lead pastor.

The race got off without a hitch at 10 a.m. despite a rainy start time. No personal times were kept, and participants were encouraged to take a break halfway through for doughnuts and coffee — a twist on the traditional hydration station.

The .5K route covered a level, grassy lawn on the church property and followed Baltzer Meyer Pike part of the way.

VIP participants didn’t even have to run the race. They paid $40 for a medal, T-shirt and someone to run for them.

Afterward, there were games and a barbecue with lemonade made by the teenagers of the church.

Stephen Huba is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Stephen at 724-850-1280, [email protected] or via Twitter .

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.