Delmont attracts visitors in droves for Apple ‘n Arts Festival | TribLIVE.com
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Delmont attracts visitors in droves for Apple ‘n Arts Festival

Stephen Huba
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Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Kaylie Ankney of Irwin organizes apple cider for sale.
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Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Volunteer workers Dakoma Thomas, left, and Kaylie Ankney, right, both of Irwin, organize gallon jugs of apple cider for customers on Saturday, Oct. 5, 2019 at Shield’s Farm in Delmont during the Delmont Apple ‘n Arts Festival.
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Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Reese Hassinger, 3, takes a bite out of an apple while her dad, Brandon Hassinger, of Irwin, shops for McIntosh apples on Saturday, Oct. 5, 2019 at Shield’s Farm in Delmont during the Delmont Apple ‘n Arts Festival.
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Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Members of the Fort Allen Antique Farm Equipment Association, Jim Ritenour, of Latrobe, left, and Chris Roddy, of Stahlstown, get an antique engine-powered drag saw running, built by the Hercules Company in the early 1900’s, while displaying the antique machinery for crowds on Saturday, Oct. 5, 2019 at Shield’s Farm in Delmont during the Delmont Apple ‘n Arts Festival.
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Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Curtis Winwood, of Irwin, tosses apple byproduct, created from the process of cider making, into a cart for spreading around the fields for compost and animal feed on Saturday, Oct. 5, 2019 at Shield’s Farm in Delmont during the Delmont Apple ‘n Arts Festival.
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Shane Dunlap | Tribune-Review
Dakoma Thomas, of Irwin, a volunteer with Fort Allen Antique Farm Equipment Association, carries carts of fresh apple cider for customers on Saturday, Oct. 5, 2019 at Shield’s Farm in Delmont during the Delmont Apple ‘n Arts Festival.

The first-time visitor to the Delmont Apple ’n Arts Festival would be excused for being a little overwhelmed.

Festival organizers pack a lot into a relatively small space.

For two days in October, this borough of 2,500 people probably triples or quadruples in size.

Most visitors come for the apples and the apple cider, so much so that they’re willing to stand in line for it.

“Cortland are my favorite,” said Julie Kolano, 41, of Irwin. “I cannot find them in the stores anywhere, so that’s why I’m loading up.”

“I’ve been coming since I was a kid, and it’s the apple cider that brings me back,” said Ethan Charlesworth, 22, of North Apollo.

And then there are the arts and craft vendors.

“There are so many art vendors that come from so many places,” said Rachel Jackson, 32, of Murrysville. “I’m going to be coming back year after year.”

Saturday was the second time at the festival for Jackson, an assistant professor of theater at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

The festival, held at Shield’s Farm on East Pittsburgh Street, continues from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Admission is free.

This year marks the festival’s 37th anniversary, and the 112th anniversary of its apple press.

Members of the Fort Allen Antique Farm Equipment Association discovered and operate the press, providing festival visitors an education in how the fruit becomes cider.

Stephen Huba is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Stephen at 724-850-1280, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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