Greensburg re-enactment brings Jesus’ trial to courthouse steps | TribLIVE.com
Westmoreland

Greensburg re-enactment brings Jesus’ trial to courthouse steps

Stephen Huba
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Edna Crosby, 58, of Greensburg, watches as actors make their way down West Third Street, during the annual "Way of the Cross" reenactment in downtown Greensburg, on Friday, April 19, 2019.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Rick Zabrosky, portraying Jesus, makes his way along South Pennsylvania Ave. during the annual "Way of the Cross" reenactment in downtown Greensburg, on Friday, April 19, 2019.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Rick Zabrosky (left), portraying Jesus, is led into First Presbyterian Church by ‘Roman Soldier’ Zack Nickischer, 16, of Hempfield, during the annual "Way of the Cross" reenactment in downtown Greensburg, on Friday, April 19, 2019.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Rick Zabrosky, portraying Jesus, makes his way along South Pennsylvania Ave. during the annual "Way of the Cross" reenactment in downtown Greensburg, on Friday, April 19, 2019.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Rick Zabrosky, portraying Jesus, makes his way along South Pennsylvania Ave. during the annual "Way of the Cross" reenactment in downtown Greensburg, on Friday, April 19, 2019.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Rick Zabrosky, portraying Jesus, makes his way along, West Otterman Street during the annual "Way of the Cross" reenactment in downtown Greensburg, on Friday, April 19, 2019.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Rick Zabrosky, portraying Jesus, makes his way along, West Otterman Street during the annual "Way of the Cross" reenactment in downtown Greensburg, on Friday, April 19, 2019.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Rick Zabrosky, portraying Jesus, makes his way along South Pennsylvania Ave. during the annual "Way of the Cross" reenactment in downtown Greensburg, on Friday, April 19, 2019.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Rick Zabrosky, portraying Jesus, makes his way along, West Otterman Street during the annual "Way of the Cross" reenactment in downtown Greensburg, on Friday, April 19, 2019.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Rick Zabrosky, portraying Jesus, makes his way along South Pennsylvania Ave. during the annual "Way of the Cross" reenactment in downtown Greensburg, on Friday, April 19, 2019.

Dozens of people braved wind and rain on Good Friday to attend the 25th annual “Way of the Cross” drama in downtown Greensburg.

For the 17th time, Rick Zabrosky reprised his role as Jesus in the hours before his crucifixion — driven relentlessly through the streets of Greensburg by eight Roman soldiers.

“It truly brings the Scriptures to life,” Zabrosky, of Greensburg, said. “I have been stopped after the event by several people who joined the procession and told how moving it was and how it brought tears to their eyes.”

The re-enactment started on the steps of the Westmoreland County Courthouse with Jesus’ trial before Pontius Pilate. Following his sentencing, he was led by the guards down a route comprising South Main Street, West Otterman Street, South Pennsylvania Avenue and West Third Street.

About 30 people dressed in biblical garb played roles, including Pontius Pilate, Roman soldiers, the Virgin Mary, women followers of Jesus, and Jewish religious leaders.

“We are not true actors. We are just members of all the Christian churches getting together to help bring the word of Christ to the people of Greensburg,” Zabrosky said. “All of the actors take their roles seriously and try to portray the event as lifelike as possible to help people remember what happened on that so very somber day.”

Greensburg police closed downtown streets as the procession made its way from the courthouse, past The Palace Theatre, past the Greensburg Hempfield Area Library, and to First Presbyterian Church, 300 S. Main St., where a service was held afterward.

Although the Crucifixion was not shown, Jesus was heard to say from inside the church narthex, “Father forgive them, for they know not what they do.”

The half-hour drama was sponsored by the Greensburg Ministerium.

Stephen Huba is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Stephen at 724-850-1280, [email protected] or via Twitter .

Categories: Local | Westmoreland
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