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Police: ‘Very large marijuana dealer’ arrested in Hempfield | TribLIVE.com
Westmoreland

Police: ‘Very large marijuana dealer’ arrested in Hempfield

Renatta Signorini
| Friday, February 22, 2019 2:33 p.m
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RENATTA SIGNORINI | TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Nickolas Boyd Hobaugh, 28, of Hempfield, is escorted into his preliminary arraignment Friday, Feb. 22, 2019. He was described by police as a “very large marijuana dealer.”
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RENATTA SIGNORINI | TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Westmoreland County detectives and Greensburg police arrested a Hempfield man Friday, Feb. 22, 2019. Police described him as a “very large marijuana dealer.”
788921_web1_gtr-aronapot
RENATTA SIGNORINI | TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Westmoreland County detectives and Greensburg police arrested a Hempfield man Friday, Feb. 22, 2019. Police described him as a "very large marijuana dealer."
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RENATTA SIGNORINI | TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Westmoreland County detectives and Greensburg police arrested a Hempfield man Friday, Feb. 22, 2019. Police described him as a "very large marijuana dealer." Westmoreland County detectives and Greensburg police arrested a Hempfield man Friday, Feb. 22, 2019. Police described him as a “very large marijuana dealer.”

A Hempfield man who police described as a “very large marijuana dealer” was arrested Friday after a search of his home.

Nickolas Boyd Hobaugh, 28, was being held at the Westmoreland County Prison without bond.

Investigators seized more than 55 pounds of marijuana and 2,200 vape pens that contain THC, the psychoactive substance in marijuana, according to county Detective Tony Marcocci.

Authorities believe Hobaugh traveled regularly to California to get the items. The marijuana was sealed in bags that police said in court papers is typical of that type of drug being shipped across state lines.

“All these items are believed to be brought into Pennsylvania from the state of California where these things are legal,” Marcocci said.

Police had been investigating the suspect for the last few years. In addition to the drugs, authorities seized $16,000, two vehicles and a large amount of steroids from the suspect’s Liberty Hill Road home. Marcocci and Greensburg Officer Garrett McNamara filed drug charges.

Hobaugh told District Judge Chris Flanigan that he works as a furniture mover and is paid under the table.

In denying him bond, Flanigan said she considered Hobaugh to be a flight risk based on the trips to the West Coast. He had been free on recognizance bond on misdemeanor drug charges filed two years ago. Marcocci said investigators found $12,000 in cash during that incident.

Prosecutors plan to file a motion Monday to have his bond revoked in that 2017 case.

Officers from Penn Township, agents from the attorney general’s office and state troopers helped county detectives and Greensburg police with the arrest.

Renatta Signorini is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Renatta at 724-837-5374, rsignorini@tribweb.com or via Twitter .

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