Seton Hill dedicates Daniel J. Wukich School of Nursing | TribLIVE.com
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Seton Hill dedicates Daniel J. Wukich School of Nursing

Patrick Varine
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Patrick Varine | Tribune-Review
Quest Healthcare Development founder and CEO Daniel Wukich speaks at the dedication ceremony for the Wukich School of Nursing at Seton Hill University on Thursday, Oct. 17, 2019.
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Patrick Varine | Tribune-Review
The Daniel J. Wukich School of Nursing was officially dedicated in Seton Hill University’s Maura Hall on Thursday, Oct. 17, 2019.
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Patrick Varine | Tribune-Review
Signage for Seton Hill University’s Daniel J. Wukich School of Nursing is unveiled on Thursday, Oct. 17, 2019.
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Patrick Varine | Tribune-Review
Quest Healthcare Development founder and CEO Daniel Wukich speaks at the dedication ceremony for the Wukich School of Nursing at Seton Hill University on Thursday, Oct. 17, 2019.
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Patrick Varine | Tribune-Review
A large crowd that came out for the dedication of Seton Hill University’s Daniel J. Wukich School of Nursing share a laugh during a presentation on Thursday, Oct. 17, 2019.
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Patrick Varine | Tribune-Review
Quest Healthcare Development founder and CEO Daniel Wukich speaks at the dedication ceremony for the Wukich School of Nursing at Seton Hill University on Thursday, Oct. 17, 2019.

When the Sisters of Charity founded Seton Hill College in 1918, they placed an emphasis on the sciences being taught to female students.

And while the Sisters did have a nursing education program at the former Pittsburgh Hospital, Seton Hill University never offered a formal nursing degree program.

That changed after a 2017 dinner with university trustee Daniel Wukich and Seton Hill President Mary Finger.

“She said to me over dinner, ‘Why don’t you sponsor a nursing school?’ I said ‘How much?’ She gave me a number and I told her, ‘You have a deal,’” said Wukich, founder and CEO of Quest Healthcare Development.

Wukich said the decision was easy for him.

“I believe if you can, you should,” he said.

At the beginning of the 2019-20 school year, the inaugural class of 26 students entered the Daniel J. Wukich School of Nursing. An official ribbon cutting was held Thursday night.

“I don’t believe we can ever find enough nurses,” Wukich said. “But I want to make sure that we do have enough here.”

Wukich is not wrong. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, nearly a half-million nurses nationwide are expected to reach retirement age by 2022.

Sister Susan Yochum said Seton Hill’s program “is infused with technology that will enhance students’ nursing experience.”

That includes a skills lab, interactive mannequins and a soon-to-be-added high-fidelity simulation lab.

“I’ve been privileged to lend my expertise in business and health care to this program, and I’m proud to help offer it to Seton Hill students,” Wukich said.

For freshman Chloe Pohland, 18, of Latrobe, it was the perfect fit.

“I immediately found a sense of community here,” Pohland said, “a place where everyone was friendly and supportive, and where I was not just a number.”

Wukich congratulated Pohland and other members of the inaugural class who were in attendance at Thursday’s dedication.

“I’m really glad you came here, kid,” Wukich told Pohland. “And I hope you bring a lot more people here.”

Patrick Varine is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Patrick at 724-850-2862, [email protected] or via Twitter .

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