Weekend auction in Armbrust benefits emaciated rescue horses | TribLIVE.com
Westmoreland

Weekend auction in Armbrust benefits emaciated rescue horses

Renatta Signorini

It’s going to be a long road to recovery for three horses that were rescued from an Armstrong County farm over the weekend by a Westmoreland County nonprofit.

“They’re like walking skeletons in halters,” said Chris LeJeune, co-founder of Second Chance Equine Association.

That means expensive veterinary bills and volunteers working around the clock to care for the horses at the Armbrust-based group’s barn.

“We have high expectations that we can save the horses. You never know when they come in in this kind of condition,” said Paul Reed, association president. “… Hopefully, we can get these turned around and find them a good home.”

Second Chance is holding a public auction Saturday in an effort to raise money for food and veterinarian bills for Comanche, Lakota and Apache. The auction will feature numerous donated items, ranging from a farm tractor and household goods to mountain bikes and antiques.

“There’s just something for everybody,” LeJeune said.

Armstrong County investigators seized six horses from a farm in Dayton after information about their conditions from concerned citizens, according to District Attormey Katie Charlton. The other three horses are being cared for at other rescue organizations.

Charges are expected to be filed against the owner of the animals, Charlton said in a statement.

Second Chance volunteers feed and treat the emaciated geldings every few hours. All of the horses have hoof issues, and one has ulcers in its stomach and mouth.

“This is going to be weeks of just getting them to eat like a normal horse,” LeJeune said.

Association members were planning the auction long before the trio of horses came to their barn. They planned to raise money for any horse that needed help, but that need emerged a little more quickly than anticipated.

“We have to have money because we never know what anything’s going to cost or when we’re going to get a call,” LeJeune said.

“It adds up. It adds up quicker than people think,” Reed said. “The outpouring of the money is only for the animals. It does not go to anybody else.”

The last time the organization had three horses in similar shape, it spent $11,000 over 11 months for the animals’ care, Reed said. Volunteers are feeding the latest rescues small amounts and paying attention to other bodily functions.

“We’ve had to take a much slower road to starting to feed them,” he said.

A listing of some of the items that will be available at Saturday’s auction with Reed’s Auction Co. is available at auctionzip.com/Listings/3328794.html. It will be held at Second Chance’s barn at 527 Stone Church Road, Armbrust, at the intersection with Route 819.

Donations can be made online or mailed to SCEA at P.O. Box 193, Norvelt, PA 15674. For more details about becoming a volunteer or member, visit scearescue.com.

Renatta Signorini is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Renatta at 724-837-5374, [email protected] or via Twitter .


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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Chris LeJeune works with a recently rescued standardbred at Second Chance Equine Rescue in Hempfield Township, on Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019. Six emaciated and neglected horses were recently rescued from a farm in Armstrong County, after their owner leased a field from a farmer and then abandoned the horses.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Chris LeJeune (left), and Paul Reed, talk about the three rescued Standardbreds that they recently brought to Second Chance Equine Rescue in Hempfield Township, on Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019. Six emaciated and neglected horses were recently rescued from a farm in Armstrong County, after their owner leased a field from a farmer and then abandoned the horses.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Chris LeJeune (left), and Paul Reed, give a dose of medicine to a recently rescued Standardbred Lakota, at Second Chance Equine Rescue in Hempfield Township, on Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019. Six emaciated and neglected horses were recently rescued by Second Chance, from a farm in Armstrong County, after their owner leased a field from a farmer and then abandoned the horses.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Chris LeJeune walks a recently rescued standardbred at Second Chance Equine Rescue in Hempfield Township, on Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019. Six emaciated and neglected horses were recently rescued from a farm in Armstrong County, after their owner leased a field from a farmer and then abandoned the horses.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Paul Reed puts a halter on a recently rescued Standardbred Lakota, to bring him out for one of his daily doses of medicine, at Second Chance Equine Rescue in Hempfield Township, on Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019. Six emaciated and neglected horses were recently rescued from a farm in Armstrong County, after their owner leased a field from a farmer and then abandoned the horses.
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Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Chris LeJeune (left), and Paul Reed, show off the condition of recently rescued Standardbred, at Second Chance Equine Rescue in Hempfield Township, on Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019. Six emaciated and neglected horses were recently rescued by Second Chance, from a farm in Armstrong County, after their owner leased a field from a farmer and then abandoned the horses.
Categories: Local | Westmoreland
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