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Alle-Kiski Valley bands will rock it for young teen's benefit

| Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2012, 8:59 p.m.
Cate Fouse and Matthew Wilmot of Suffacate perform. Photo submitted in September 2012.
William Domiano
Cate Fouse and Matthew Wilmot of Suffacate perform. Photo submitted in September 2012. William Domiano
Taylor Hruby (left) with her sister, Alicia Hruby of Monongahela, for whom the benefit Pennsylvania Rock Show Concert is being held on Saturday, Sept. 29, 2012, at Iselin Ballfield, Young Township, Indiana County.
Courtesy of Donna Hruby
Taylor Hruby (left) with her sister, Alicia Hruby of Monongahela, for whom the benefit Pennsylvania Rock Show Concert is being held on Saturday, Sept. 29, 2012, at Iselin Ballfield, Young Township, Indiana County. Courtesy of Donna Hruby

William Domiano is not a musician, but he probably is as active in the Alle-Kiski Valley music scene as any performer.

The Leechburg resident is using that involvement to celebrate a milestone and help a family friend facing a serious health issue.

The eighth anniversary of the Pennsylvania Rock Show Concert, which he has organized from noon to midnight Saturday at Iselin Ballfield, Young Township, will provide a sampling of styles from 11 area bands — from country to rock and more. There will be optional camping on this property owned by Leechburg Moose.

Proceeds will benefit the medical care of Alicia Hruby, 13, of Monongahela.

“She has a rare condition that only 30 other people in the world have been diagnosed with,” Domiano says. “She has had two different autoimmune diseases attack her liver, and as a result, will need a full liver transplant.”

Extensive tests also revealed an enlarged spleen. “Bone pain in her body has left her unable to walk, and she uses crutches and a wheelchair to get around,” Domiano says. “Autoimmune liver disease is a life-long illness and she will need blood transfusions before surgery and occasionally to bring up the platelet levels while awaiting the transplant surgery.”

All the bands are performing for free.

“The musicians from this area have huge hearts. They're like a huge, extended family to me,” he says. “They realize that these ailments could happen to anyone at any time, and they want to help as many people as they can.”

He selected the line-up, which he says includes “some of the best talent in Southwestern Pennsylvania,” Domiano finds considerable satisfaction in helping to keep the spotlight on local bands. To that end, he created the Pennsylvania Rock Show (www.parockshow.com) eight years ago. The labor of love is a commercial-free online radio show/podcast that he hosts featuring a studio guest and which offers listeners what he considers “some of the best unsigned bands that Pennsylvania has to offer.”

It airs at 8 p.m. Fridays through FanOff.com, a podcast network, and is rebroadcast on a growing number of outlets on some of the Internet's largest radio stations.

“The bands from this area are just as good as what you hear on the radio in normal rotation. They just need to be heard by the right people to get there, he says. “This is why I created the Pennsylvania Rock Show, to get the great music of the A-K music scene and surrounding area out to people all over the world.”

Domiano began in music by designing band websites.

“Over the years, the bands and musicians have been great to me, and I decided to create both www.akmusicscene.com (an informational website housing information on local bands) and parockshow.com as a way to give back to them,” he says. “Every national or international musician started out as a local musician at some point. The musicians here are especially giving and community-oriented, and that's why I have spent so much time supporting them.”

Rex Rutkoski is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 724-226-4664 or rrutkoski@tribweb.com

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