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Allegory Gallery showcases new shop location

| Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014, 9:00 p.m.
At the East Main St reet Allegory Gallery classroom, students (from left) Christine Long of Central City, Karen Shablik of North Huntingdon, instructor Lynne Suprock of Ligonier, Alison Herington of Ligonier and Ann Mergl of Sharon, work on making molds for resin jewelry by pressing various shapes into the molds,  They are wearing tiara’s made from the ends of silverware on their heads made by  the same mold and resin process.
 
 
 
 
photo 8/9/2014  Ligonier East Main st   Bill Pribisco l Ligonier Echo
Bill Pribisco | for Trib total Media
At the East Main St reet Allegory Gallery classroom, students (from left) Christine Long of Central City, Karen Shablik of North Huntingdon, instructor Lynne Suprock of Ligonier, Alison Herington of Ligonier and Ann Mergl of Sharon, work on making molds for resin jewelry by pressing various shapes into the molds, They are wearing tiara’s made from the ends of silverware on their heads made by the same mold and resin process. photo 8/9/2014 Ligonier East Main st Bill Pribisco l Ligonier Echo

Allegory Gallery recently conducted a day full of artistic activity at the new 215 E. Main St. location.

Beginning with a stone infusion jewelry class taught by Lynne Suprock and concluding with the opening reception of artist Cynthia Thornton's latest show “Wonder Cabinet,” those in attendance were treated to an array of talent.

“We had a wonderful turnout,” said gallery co-owner Andrew Thornton of Bolivar. “At one point it got so crowded that people had to wait outside before they could comfortably come in. The new location is going really well. We love the new space. It's brighter and lighter and we have more room to showcase our beads and artists.”

A Pittsburgh native who has taught classes all over the county, Suprock's workshop was the first held in the gallery's new location.

“The store's classroom was the perfect creative space - uplifting and artfully inspiring,” said Suprock.

Suprock said she was pleased to find participants coming from as far as Sharon.

During the workshop, Suprock demonstrated how to recreate natural stones and gems.

“My workshop demonstrated how to use environmentally friendly mold making products by Amazing Crafting Products, to either replicate, or create unique precious gems, minerals or found objects,” Suprock said.

Workshop participants then “painted with pearls” by mixing alumidust powder with two parts resin to create beautiful one-of-a-kind pieces of jewelry.

“Nature has given us some of the most beautiful sunsets to paint, landscapes to frame and wonders to gaze upon,” said Suprock. “She has dibs on the palette of art and design which allow our senses to experience extraordinary pleasure. Nature's beauty sets the standards and defines how we critique our art… from the minutia to the grandiose. We've only to replicate nature's elegance (to create) our most successful, artistic endeavors.”

Karen Shablik, who participated in Suprock's workshop, said she found the class to be relaxing and full of creative experimenting.

“It's always a pleasure to visit Allegory Gallery,” she said. “The gallery is such an asset to the Ligonier Valley. I found Lynne to be very charming and talented. It was such a fun way to spend a Saturday afternoon!”

Suprock currently designs, writes and conducts workshops in the art community. She began her career as a mixed media artist in 2007, after 29 years as a leader in nursing education.

She is a national creative mixed media instructor with jewelry featured in Stampington Magazines and Lark books.

Additionally, Suprock is a member of the 2014 Amazing Crafting Product Design Team.

“Lynne is an excellent teacher and we are lucky to know her,” Thornton said of the artist.

“We met several years ago and instantly clicked and now she's an ‘art sister'. “We bounce ideas off of each other and collaborate often.”

Additional information about Suprock and her work can be found by visiting: www.simplyprettystuff.blogspot.com or www.amazingmoldputty.blogspot.com.

Cynthia Thornton exhibit opens

Twelve small-scale original artworks by Asheville-based artist, Cynthia Thornton, make up ‘Wonder Cabinet' — the exhibit currently being featured at Allegory Galley.

“The inspiration for the show came from a cabinet I saw while traveling in Paris some years ago,” shared Thornton, who said she is very happy with show's success.

“I was completely bewitched by these amazing displays filled with natural curiosities, paintings, miniatures, relics from saints, horns or claws from fantastic creatures and treasured books. I liked that the collectors had to track down each piece, and probably had an interesting story or a frightful adventure in the process.

Anyway, my cabinet is ever growing, changing and evolving. Right now dolls, strange pods, marbles and odd toys I've picked up over the years are on the shelves.”

Thornton said her collection of paintings for this show are sized to fit perfectly within ones own wonder cabinet.

The paintings are rendered in an opaque watercolor (called “gouache”), Daniel Smith gemstone pigments, and tempera on tinted illustration board.

The pieces are framed in shadowboxes to further the “wonder cabinet” aesthetic.

“What I love about this collection is that the artist approaches her subject matter as an explorer,” said Andrew Thornton. “She investigates this magical world through its flora, fauna and minerals. The show reminds me of early travel diaries, detailing the exotic finds from far flung destinations. The fantastical universe illustrated in her petite paintings is full of mythological creatures, rich with symbolism and loaded with whimsy.”

Her second solo show at Allegory Gallery, Thornton's work will be featured on the gallery's Project Wall through Oct. 31.

“It was a very a nice opening,” said Patricia Childs, owner of G Squared Gallery. “A must see...with affordable original art.”

Thornton holds a degree in 3-D illustration and is the proprietor of Green Girl Studios, a company producing fine pewter, silver, bronze and shibuichi jewelry.

Thornton opened the studio early in her career as an artist as a way to create “miniature sculpture” and provide an escape from the rigors of a freelance illustrator's life.

Thornton is also the author and illustrator of the book, “Enchanted Adornments: Creating Jewelry with Metal Clay, Resin, Wire and More”, which focuses on the creation of fantasy-inspired mixed media jewelry.

Thornton participated in the opening reception via Skype.

“It's is a great way for the artists that we represent, who aren't local, to participate with the local art enthusiasts and creative community in Ligonier,” said Andrew Thornton.

Thornton said he was very pleased with the weekend's success, which drew patrons from New York and all across Pennsylvania.

“It's taking awhile for people to figure out that we've moved a few shops down, but the word is getting out slowly but surely,” Thornton said. “We've already had visitors from all over the country stop in to see our new place. We're really happy with the changes we've made and are looking forward to setting down more roots in the new space.”

Cami DiBattista is a contributing writer for Trib Total Media.

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