ShareThis Page
News

Hampton 8th-grader wins state geography bee

| Wednesday, April 8, 2015, 9:00 p.m.
Tejas Badgujar (fifth from left, next to kid in green shirt), 13, of Hampton won the National Geographic State Bee on March 27 and will go on to the national geography bee in May.
Submitted
Tejas Badgujar (fifth from left, next to kid in green shirt), 13, of Hampton won the National Geographic State Bee on March 27 and will go on to the national geography bee in May.
Tejas Badgujar, left, an eighth grader at Hampton Middle School won first place in the 2015 National Geographic State Bee. He is standing with second place winner Daniel Krill, an eighth grade student from Pine-Richland.
Submitted
Tejas Badgujar, left, an eighth grader at Hampton Middle School won first place in the 2015 National Geographic State Bee. He is standing with second place winner Daniel Krill, an eighth grade student from Pine-Richland.

Winning the 2015 National Geographic Bee's state competition was a dream come true for Hampton Middle School eighth-grader Tejas Badgujar.

“I was pretty excited since it was my first time,” he said. “I felt like I wanted to cry and laugh at the same time.”

The 13-year-old took the state geography bee title on March 27 in Harrisburg. Daniel Krill, an eighth-grader from Pine-Richland Middle School, took second place.

Tejas' mother, Snehal Badgujar, said she was nervous watching her son go up against school champions from across the state. She and her husband, Sunil, and Tejas' younger sister, Saisha, traveled with him to Harrisburg to watch him compete.

“I was kind of nervous during the competition because he worked really hard to get to the top four,” Snehal Badgujar said. “But it was really exciting when he won.”

The winning question was “What country includes the islands of Melville, Mornington and Bathurst?” Tejas correctly responded with “Australia.”

He will move on to compete against state winners from across the country in the National Geographic Bee preliminary round on May 11 in Washington The final rounds will air on the National Geographic Channel at 8 p.m. May 15.

The geography bee quizzes students on more than just cities and locations. Tejas said questions also cover culture; climate; geopolitics; physical geography; and things such as festivals that are held in certain countries, local foods and dishes, and even native animals.

He practices by constantly reviewing atlases and books. The family has a library of more than 100 geography books in their home, his mother said.

“He reads a lot, and that's how he got to this level,” Snehal Badgujar said.

Tejas said he has been interested in geography since he was little. Understanding geography opens up a person's understanding of the cultures and places around them, he said.

“Geography is all about our world, and most people don't know much about the world,” Tejas said.

For winning the state competition, Tejas received an atlas, $100 and an all-expenses-paid trip to the national competition. If he wins the national competition, he will receive a trip for two to the Galapagos Islands, a $50,000 college scholarship and a lifetime membership in the National Geographic Society.

But Tejas said he doesn't do it for the money. He does it for the prestige, he said.

“I do it just to be proud that I have the title of National Geographic winner,” Tejas said.

Rachel Farkas is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 724-772-6364 or rfarkas@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me