ShareThis Page
News

Morning update: Taking a stand, private meeting, Irish Fest

| Thursday, Sept. 8, 2016, 6:39 a.m.

A look at what's happening and what's coming up in Western Pennsylvania.

Bridge repairs to begin Thursday

Crews are moving fast to try to repair fire damage to the Liberty Bridge in Pittsburgh. They'll use steel made in New Castle and install it in a difficult feat of engineering.

Chief meets with council

Pittsburgh police Chief Cameron McLay will meet privately with members of city council on Thursday to discuss the department's proposal to change how police respond to some calls for service.

Bus driver, company sued

The family of a Penn-Trafford boy has filed suit against the bus company and its driver who had their son get out and remove a live electrical wire hanging over the bus.

Contract on hold

Greensburg Salem school board hoped to start the new year with a teachers contract in place, but talks have stalled again. Teachers continue to opt out of any activities not mandated by contract.

Taking a stand

NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick's controversial protest during the national anthem set off a firestorm of debate. At a local level, high school football coaches respect his right to protest while encouraging patriotic tributes from their teams. For more Week 2 coverage, visit our high school sports page.

Here to stay

With the season just days away, Steelers All-Pro guard David DeCastro said he is “getting close” to signing a long-term extension to remain with the team.

Irish eyes'll be smiling

Sure, St. Patrick's Day is a half of a year away, but you can still celebrate the Emerald Isle this weekend at the Pittsburgh Irish Festival.

Thursday's weather

It's going to be hot. Forecast for Pittsburgh is 86 degrees on Thursday, but some parts of Western Pennsylvania could hit 90. Overnight, the temps should cool off to about 69, WPXI meteorologists say.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me