ShareThis Page
News

Ohio man runs down defending champ to win triathlon

| Sunday, Aug. 9, 2015, 1:51 p.m.
Chad Holderbaum (left), 35, of North Huntington, talks with Nick Glavac, 28, of Mentor, Ohio after being the first two to cross the finish line at the 18th Annual Pittsburgh Triathlon on Sunday, Aug. 9, 2015. Glavac came in first, saying, 'I wanted to come here for a really hard workout.'
Stephanie Strasburg | Trib Total Media
Chad Holderbaum (left), 35, of North Huntington, talks with Nick Glavac, 28, of Mentor, Ohio after being the first two to cross the finish line at the 18th Annual Pittsburgh Triathlon on Sunday, Aug. 9, 2015. Glavac came in first, saying, 'I wanted to come here for a really hard workout.'
Athletes swim under the Roberto Clemente Bridge in the Allegheny River for the swimming portion of the Pittsburgh Triathlon on Sunday, Aug. 9, 2015. The race took on a new course this year, moving from the North Shore starting line in years past to a Point State Park-centered trek.
Stephanie Strasburg | Trib Total Media
Athletes swim under the Roberto Clemente Bridge in the Allegheny River for the swimming portion of the Pittsburgh Triathlon on Sunday, Aug. 9, 2015. The race took on a new course this year, moving from the North Shore starting line in years past to a Point State Park-centered trek.
Athletes swim under the Roberto Clemente Bridge in the Allegheny River for the swimming segment of the 18th Annual Pittsburgh Triathlon on Sunday, Aug. 9, 2015.
Stephanie Strasburg | Trib Total Media
Athletes swim under the Roberto Clemente Bridge in the Allegheny River for the swimming segment of the 18th Annual Pittsburgh Triathlon on Sunday, Aug. 9, 2015.
Athletes jump into the Allegheny River from the Downtown shoreline to take their places for the swimming segment of the 18th Annual Pittsburgh Triathlon on Sunday, Aug. 9, 2015. Participants swam from the Roberto Clemente Bridge up past the Ninth Street Bridge, and then back to the Fort Duquesne Bridge for a cumulative 1.5K swim.
Stephanie Strasburg | Trib Total Media
Athletes jump into the Allegheny River from the Downtown shoreline to take their places for the swimming segment of the 18th Annual Pittsburgh Triathlon on Sunday, Aug. 9, 2015. Participants swam from the Roberto Clemente Bridge up past the Ninth Street Bridge, and then back to the Fort Duquesne Bridge for a cumulative 1.5K swim.
Athletes climb out of the Allegheny River beneath the Fort Duquesne Bridge after completing the 1.5K swimming segment of the 18th Annual Pittsburgh Triathlon on Sunday, Aug. 9, 2015. Participants swam from the Roberto Clemente Bridge up past the Ninth Street Bridge, and then back to the Fort Duquesne Bridge for a cumulative 1.5K swim.
Stephanie Strasburg | Trib Total Media
Athletes climb out of the Allegheny River beneath the Fort Duquesne Bridge after completing the 1.5K swimming segment of the 18th Annual Pittsburgh Triathlon on Sunday, Aug. 9, 2015. Participants swam from the Roberto Clemente Bridge up past the Ninth Street Bridge, and then back to the Fort Duquesne Bridge for a cumulative 1.5K swim.
Erin McCarthy, 25, of Pittsburgh, swims the Allegheny River for the swimming segment of the 18th Annual Pittsburgh Triathlon on Sunday, Aug. 9, 2015.
Stephanie Strasburg | Trib Total Media
Erin McCarthy, 25, of Pittsburgh, swims the Allegheny River for the swimming segment of the 18th Annual Pittsburgh Triathlon on Sunday, Aug. 9, 2015.
Gabriel Garcia, 19, of Pittsburgh, climbs out of the Allegheny River beneath the Fort Duquesne Bridge after completing a 1.5K swimming segment of the 18th Annual Pittsburgh Triathlon on Sunday, Aug. 9, 2015.
Stephanie Strasburg | Trib Total Media
Gabriel Garcia, 19, of Pittsburgh, climbs out of the Allegheny River beneath the Fort Duquesne Bridge after completing a 1.5K swimming segment of the 18th Annual Pittsburgh Triathlon on Sunday, Aug. 9, 2015.
Ben Erdeljac, 37, of Pittsburgh, rides his bicycle across the Andy Warhol Bridge while competing in the 18th Annual Pittsburgh Triathlon on Sunday, Aug. 9, 2015. Erdeljac finished in fifth place.
Stephanie Strasburg | Trib Total Media
Ben Erdeljac, 37, of Pittsburgh, rides his bicycle across the Andy Warhol Bridge while competing in the 18th Annual Pittsburgh Triathlon on Sunday, Aug. 9, 2015. Erdeljac finished in fifth place.
Candace Connolly, 24, of West Chester (right), and Kristen Whitlinger, 25, of Friendship, cheer on athletes by the finish line of the 18th Annual Pittsburgh Triathlon on Sunday, Aug. 9, 2015. The women came to cheer on their brother and boyfriend, respectively. Connolly also competed in the relay earlier in the weekend.
Stephanie Strasburg | Trib Total Media
Candace Connolly, 24, of West Chester (right), and Kristen Whitlinger, 25, of Friendship, cheer on athletes by the finish line of the 18th Annual Pittsburgh Triathlon on Sunday, Aug. 9, 2015. The women came to cheer on their brother and boyfriend, respectively. Connolly also competed in the relay earlier in the weekend.

Chad Holderbaum is always a favorite to win the Pittsburgh Triathlon, but the defending champion couldn't match the foot speed of Nick Glavac in Sunday's international distance race.

Glavac, 28, of Mentor, Ohio, caught Holderbaum midway through the 10K run in the final leg of the race and won with a time of 1:57:07. Holderbaum finished second, clocking in at 1:59:15.

“(Holderbaum) pushed me pretty hard,” Glavac said. “I was chasing him down really hard the whole way. On the bike, I kept seeing him and kept estimating the gap. It's a loop course, so I saw him a couple times and saw how far ahead he was of me. Luckily, I had some good running legs and was able to run him down. When I passed him, I passed him pretty good and tried to look comfortable even though I was hurting.”

Holderbaum won in 2011 and '14, and he placed second in '12. He and Glavac are professional triathletes who normally focus on much longer races, including Ironman and Half-Ironman distances.

“It was good until he caught me on that turnaround on the run,” said Holderbaum, 35, of North Huntington. “My big race is next weekend up in Canada, so I kind of jumped into this last minute. I saw that (Glavac) was racing, and I was like, all right, I actually have to work today. I tried to hold him off best I could, but he had the legs in him to run me down.”

Bobby Thorborg, 24, of Falls Church, Va., finished third in the men's race.

Ashley Kearcher, 27, of Hershey, won the women's race with a time of 2:27:27, beating Amanda Brodish (2:30:26) and Robin Scaife, 30, a Northern California native now living in Mt. Lebanon, who finished in 2:31:36.

Approximately 150 competitors and 10 relay teams finished Sunday's race.

Kearcher competed in the shorter sprint distance triathlon the past seven years and won in 2014, then finished second Saturday before competing in the international distance for the first time Sunday.

She also made her move on the turnaround of the run to pass two women and move into first.

Kearcher, like many, had good reviews of the venue change from the North Shore to Point State Park. The 1,500-meter swim was still in the Allegheny River, albeit entering and exiting from the opposite bank than in previous years. The bulk of the 40K bike portion still consisted largely of two laps on the I-279 HOV lane.

The 10K run changed the most, taking runners around the fountain, and then along the Allegheny, across the Roberto Clemente Bridge and toward Washington's Landing on the riverfront trail before turning around.

“I loved the run in general, running around the Point,” Kearcher said. “It was a little change, but I really liked the whole thing.”

Karen Price is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. Reach her at kprice@tribweb.com or via Twitter @KarenPrice_Trib.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me