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Wolf takes jabs at GOP lawmakers in stop in Pittsburgh

| Thursday, Jan. 7, 2016, 4:30 p.m.
Governor Tom Wolf looks over a “Boomerang” drone with Dick Zhang that can be used at construction sites during a stop at AlphaLab Gear in East Liberty, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2016.
Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review
Governor Tom Wolf looks over a “Boomerang” drone with Dick Zhang that can be used at construction sites during a stop at AlphaLab Gear in East Liberty, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2016.
Gov. Tom Wolf discusses the state budget during a stop at AlphaLab Gear in East Liberty, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2016.
Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review
Gov. Tom Wolf discusses the state budget during a stop at AlphaLab Gear in East Liberty, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2016.
Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf
Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review
Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf
Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf
Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review
Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf
Governor Tom Wolf and Innovation Works President and CEO Richard Lunak discuss technology innovation happening at AlphaLab Gear in East Liberty, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2016.
Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review
Governor Tom Wolf and Innovation Works President and CEO Richard Lunak discuss technology innovation happening at AlphaLab Gear in East Liberty, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2016.
Governor Tom Wolf meets with workers at AlphaLab Gear in East Liberty, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2016.
Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review
Governor Tom Wolf meets with workers at AlphaLab Gear in East Liberty, Wednesday, Jan. 7, 2016.

Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf on Thursday continued to rail against Republican legislators after their most recent rejection of a state budget.

He made a stop at Alpha-Lab Gear in East Liberty as part of his “Jobs that Pay” tour, promoting investment in Pennsylvania entrepreneurs and technology startups. Following a meet-and-greet with other business owners from the area, Wolf praised Pittsburgh for its support and attractiveness to new businesses and entrepreneurs. He answered questions about the months-long budget standoff in Harrisburg.

“Don't hire people who think the job is not to show up,” he advised the business owners who gathered to hear him speak.

Wolf was critical of what he said was a last-minute dissolution of budget negotiations. A deal had been reached that passed in the Senate but failed in the House.

“I'm not sure what more needs to be done,” Wolf said. “If they don't want to have a budget, I don't know what more I can do beyond what I've already done.”

Stephen Miskin, a spokesman for House Republicans reached after the governor's comments, criticized Wolf for his constant attacks and attempts at starting “partisan fights.”

Miskin maintains that Wolf's line-item vetoes cut billions of dollars from education, trauma centers, Medicaid and regional poison control centers and called for higher taxes.

“He acts like a schoolyard bully trying to get his way,” Miskin said.

Wolf said he negotiated and made compromises, but a group of Republican “extremists” derailed the latest attempt to pass a budget.

“Folks, elections have consequences,” Wolf said. “This is where Pennsylvania is, and these are the consequences we face.”

Elizabeth Behrman is a staff writer for the Tribune-Review. She can be reached at 412-320-7886.

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