Dining, laughing, living amid Hong Kong protests | TribLIVE.com
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Dining, laughing, living amid Hong Kong protests

Associated Press
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AP
In this Monday, Sept. 2, 2019, photo, two commuters ride an escalator at a train station past police officers in riot gear deployed to arrest protesters in Hong Kong. Life is not quite normal after three months of steady protests in the Asian financial center - and yet normal life goes on, as it must, for the cityճ 7.4 million residents.
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AP
In this Sept. 2, 2019, photo, a taxi driver eats his late dinner in his car near the Temple Street Night Market in Hong Kong. Life is not quite normal after three months of steady protests in the Asian financial center - and yet normal life goes on, as it must, for the cityճ 7.4 million residents.
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AP
In this Sept. 3, 2019, a group of elderly people play mahjong at a shop in Hong Kong. Life is not quite normal after three months of steady protests in the Asian financial center - and yet normal life goes on, as it must, for the cityճ 7.4 million residents.
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AP
In this Sept. 2, 2019, photo, a woman stretching at a coffee shop is seen through a window with condensation in Hong Kong. Life is not quite normal after three months of steady protests in the Asian financial center - and yet normal life goes on, as it must, for the cityճ 7.4 million residents.
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In this Aug. 31, 2019, photo, spectators watch as pro-democracy protesters march in central Hong Kong. Life is not quite normal after three months of steady protests in the Asian financial center - and yet normal life goes on, as it must, for the cityճ 7.4 million residents.
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In this Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019 photo, a man sets up his camera in the Victoria Peak area to photograph Hong Kong’s skyline. Life is not quite normal after three months of steady protests in the Asian financial center - and yet normal life goes on, as it must, for the cityճ 7.4 million residents.
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In this Sept. 1, 2019, photo, people wait for buses at a bus stop vandalized by protesters in Hong Kong. Life is not quite normal after three months of steady protests in the Asian financial center - and yet normal life goes on, as it must, for the cityճ 7.4 million residents.
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AP
In this Sept. 1, 2019, photo, an old apartment building stands next to a gleaming tower in Hong Kong. Life is not quite normal after three months of steady protests in the Asian financial center - and yet normal life goes on, as it must, for the cityճ 7.4 million residents.
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AP
In this Saturday, Aug. 31, 2019, photo, pro-democracy protesters march along a street past a restaurant in Hong Kong. Life is not quite normal after three months of steady protests in the Asian financial center - and yet normal life goes on, as it must, for the cityճ 7.4 million residents.
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In this Sept. 2, 2019, photo, workers bundle rebars at a metal yard as a building displaying Chinese national flags is seen in the distance in Hong Kong. Life is not quite normal after three months of steady protests in the Asian financial center - and yet normal life goes on, as it must, for the cityճ 7.4 million residents.
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AP
In this Sept. 3, 2019, photo, a tourist poses for photos in front of a popular mural by artist Alex Croft Saturday in the SoHo district of Hong Kong. Life is not quite normal after three months of steady protests in the Asian financial center - and yet normal life goes on, as it must, for the cityճ 7.4 million residents.
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In this Saturday, Aug. 31, 2019 photo, Pro-democracy protesters march in central Hong Kong. Life is not quite normal after three months of steady protests in the Asian financial center - and yet normal life goes on, as it must, for the cityճ 7.4 million residents.

HONG KONG (AP) — A couple in wedding dress and tuxedo pose for photos on Hong Kong’s famed Victoria Peak. A diner at a streetside restaurant focuses on his food while protesters march by. Two people ride the up escalator as a phalanx of riot-ready police descends on the other side.

Life is not quite normal after three months of steady protests in this Asian financial center — and yet normal life goes on, as it must, for the city’s 7.4 million people.

Residents, tourists and laughter fill the restaurants at the Temple Street night market, though declining airport arrivals and discounted hotel rooms show the tourism industry’s pain.

“There’s a lot going on here at the moment, obviously, but still a lovely place to be,” said David Smith, a 49-year-old British man sitting with friends at an outdoor table on a rain-dampened street. “You just have to be more careful when you are here.”

The images of this summer’s pro-democracy and anti-police and anti-government protests have been riveting. Repeated bursts of tear gas. Homemade gasoline bombs hurled at police. Blood stains on the ground. A sea of umbrellas as marchers take over downtown streets.

Away from, or between, the madness, old-timers play their mahjong tiles. Bright laundry hangs from a drab apartment building in this vertical city. Spray-painted slogans cover a Kate Spade advertisement on a bus shelter. On the other side, people wait for the bus.

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