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Letter written aboard Titanic sells for $200,000

| Saturday, April 26, 2014, 12:24 p.m.
In this undated image released by Henry Aldridge And Son Autioneers, Saturday April 26, 2014, showing the envelope, part of a letter written by Esther Hart and her seven-year-old daughter Eva as they sailed aboard RMS Titanic in April 1912, shortly before the ship struck an iceberg and sank in the North Atlantic Ocean with 15,00 souls. Esther Hart survived, and so did the letter she wrote because her husband put the letter inside the pocket of his coat which he gave to his wife to keep warm, giving exquisite details about the voyage aboard the ill-fated Titanic.
In this undated image released by Henry Aldridge And Son Autioneers, Saturday April 26, 2014, showing the envelope, part of a letter written by Esther Hart and her seven-year-old daughter Eva as they sailed aboard RMS Titanic in April 1912, shortly before the ship struck an iceberg and sank in the North Atlantic Ocean with 15,00 souls. Esther Hart survived, and so did the letter she wrote because her husband put the letter inside the pocket of his coat which he gave to his wife to keep warm, giving exquisite details about the voyage aboard the ill-fated Titanic.
An undated handout reproduction of a letter released in London by Henry Aldridge and Son Auctioneers on April 1, 2014, shows a page of the only known letter to have been written on board the Titanic on the day the liner struck an iceberg and sank.
AFP/Getty Images
An undated handout reproduction of a letter released in London by Henry Aldridge and Son Auctioneers on April 1, 2014, shows a page of the only known letter to have been written on board the Titanic on the day the liner struck an iceberg and sank.
In this undated image released by Henry Aldridge And Son Autioneers, Saturday April 26, 2014, showing part of a letter written by Esther Hart and her seven-year-old daughter Eva as they sailed aboard RMS Titanic in April 1912, shortly before the ship struck an iceberg and sank in the North Atlantic Ocean with 15,00 souls. Hart survived, and so did the letter she wrote because her husband put the letter inside the pocket of his coat which he gave to his wife to keep warm, giving exquisite details about the voyage aboard the ill-fated Titanic.
In this undated image released by Henry Aldridge And Son Autioneers, Saturday April 26, 2014, showing part of a letter written by Esther Hart and her seven-year-old daughter Eva as they sailed aboard RMS Titanic in April 1912, shortly before the ship struck an iceberg and sank in the North Atlantic Ocean with 15,00 souls. Hart survived, and so did the letter she wrote because her husband put the letter inside the pocket of his coat which he gave to his wife to keep warm, giving exquisite details about the voyage aboard the ill-fated Titanic.

LONDON — A letter written by a passenger on the Titanic describing the “wonderful passage” — hours before the ship hit an iceberg — sold at auction Saturday for $200,000.

Auctioneer Andrew Aldridge said the handwritten note, which had belonged to a collector, was bought by an anonymous overseas telephone bidder during a sale in Devizes, western England.

The price, which includes a fee known as the buyer's premium, topped the pre-sale estimate of $168,000.

Aldridge said the price reflected “the exceptional quality and rarity” of the letter.

The letter was written by second-class passenger Esther Hart on April 14, 1912. “The sailors say we have had a wonderful passage up to now,” she said of the ship's journey from England toward New York.

Her 7-year-old daughter Eva added a postscript: “Heaps of love and kisses to all from Eva.”

Hours later the passenger liner described as “practically unsinkable” hit an iceberg and sank, killing more than 1,500 people including Hart's husband, Benjamin.

The letter, on White Star Line notepaper, was tucked inside the pocket of a sheepskin coat Benjamin Hart gave Esther as he put his wife and daughter in a lifeboat. The family had been traveling from England to Canada, where they planned to settle.

Esther and Eva were rescued, along with some 700 others.

Esther Hart died in 1928. Eva Hart, who died in 1996, became a prominent Titanic survivor, critical of attempts to salvage the ship, which she considered a mass grave.

Prices for Titanic memorabilia have soared in recent years. In October, a violin believed to have been played as the doomed vessel sank sold for more than 1 million pounds.

Aldridge, whose auction house specializes in Titanic items, said the continuing fascination with the ship and its passengers was no surprise.

“It was a microcosm of society,” he said. “Every man, woman and child on that ship had a story to tell, so you have over 2,200 individual subplots to the main story.

“The Titanic encapsulates almost every human emotion we are able to experience.”

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