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Education

Pittsburgh school board member Isler honored as Urban Educator of the Year

| Saturday, Oct. 10, 2015, 9:00 p.m.
Pittsburgh Public Schools board member Bill Isler accepts an award Friday, Oct. 10, 2015, in California honoring him as the 2015 Urban Educator of the Year. The award is given by the Council of the Great City Schools.
Council of the Great City Schools
Pittsburgh Public Schools board member Bill Isler accepts an award Friday, Oct. 10, 2015, in California honoring him as the 2015 Urban Educator of the Year. The award is given by the Council of the Great City Schools.
Pittsburgh Public Schools board member Bill Isler Monday, December 3, 2012 in Oakland.
Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review
Pittsburgh Public Schools board member Bill Isler Monday, December 3, 2012 in Oakland. Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review
Bill Isler and Joanne Rogers accept the Changing Lives Award in honor her husband, the late Fred Rogers, during the annual meeting of the WQED board of directors at the organization's headquarters in Oakland. Oct. 9, 2014.
John Altdorfer
Bill Isler and Joanne Rogers accept the Changing Lives Award in honor her husband, the late Fred Rogers, during the annual meeting of the WQED board of directors at the organization's headquarters in Oakland. Oct. 9, 2014.

Longtime Pittsburgh Public Schools board member Bill Isler is bringing home an award along with some lessons about improving public education from a conference of urban school district leaders in California.

Isler, who has served on the board since 1999, was named the 2015 Urban Educator of the Year by the Council of the Great City Schools at an awards ceremony Friday in Long Beach.

The council, which represents 67 large urban school districts, gives the award each year to one of its members who has made outstanding contributions in public education.

The award is named for Richard R. Green, the first black chancellor of the New York City school system, and Edward Garner, former school board president of the Denver Public Schools.

“The award is really a great honor,” Isler said in a phone interview from California. “It's a recognition of your peers from around the country.”

The five-day conference has focused on improving public education for all children, and Isler said he moderated a session Friday about community relations.

As part of the Green-Garner Award, Isler will receive a $10,000 college scholarship to present to a student. He said he will work with Superintendent Linda Lane to select the student who will receive the scholarship.

Isler, 68, of Squirrel Hill represents District 4 on the school board, which contains east end schools Pittsburgh Colfax K-8 in Squirrel Hill, Linden K-5 in Point Breeze and Allderdice High in Squirrel Hill. He is first vice president of the school board and was its president.

Isler is CEO of Fred Rogers Co., a South Side nonprofit founded by the late children's program star.

Alex Nixon is a Trib Total Media staff writer. Reach him at 412-320-7928 or anixon@tribweb.com.

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