Europeans splash, dive, swim to beat record heat | TribLIVE.com
Daily Gallery

Europeans splash, dive, swim to beat record heat

Associated Press
1463283_web1_gtr-euroheat03-072619
AP
People enjoy the sun and the fountains of the Trocadero gardens in Paris, Thursday July 25, 2019, when a new all-time high temperature of 42.6 degrees Celsius (108.7 F) hit the French capital.
1463283_web1_gtr-euroheat05-072619
AP
A boat sails as sunbathers relax during a hot summer day at the beach in De Haan, Belgium, Thursday, July 25, 2019. Belgium experienced code red, extreme heat warning, on Thursday as temperatures soared during the second heat wave of the summer.
1463283_web1_gtr-euroheat09-072619
AP
People cool off during a hot summer day at the beach in De Haan, Belgium, Thursday, July 25, 2019. Belgium experienced code red, extreme heat warning, on Thursday as temperatures soared during the second heat wave of the summer.
1463283_web1_gtr-euroheat06-072619
AP
A person dives into the water at Hathersage Outdoor Swimming Pool, in Derbyshire, England, Thursday July 25, 2019. Paris and London and places across Europe braced for record temperatures as the second heat wave this summer baked the continent.
1463283_web1_gtr-euroheat01-072619
AP
A woman protects her face from the sun with a fan while walking along a street during a hot summer day, in Pamplona, northern Spain, Thursday, July, 25, 2019. Paris, London and places across Europe braced for record temperatures Thursday as the second heat wave this summer baked the continent.
1463283_web1_gtr-euroheat07-072619
AP
A boy jumps into the water at the beach in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, July 25, 2019. Parts of Europe saw record-high temperatures on Thursday as much of the continent was trapped in a heat wave, the second in two months.
1463283_web1_gtr-euroheat02-072619
AP
People ride their horses during a hot summer day at the beach in De Haan, Belgium, Thursday, July 25, 2019. Belgium experienced code red, extreme heat warning on Thursday as temperatures soared during the second heat wave of the summer.
1463283_web1_gtr-euroheat04-072619
AP
People cool down in the fountains of the Trocadero gardens in Paris, Thursday July 25, 2019, when a new all-time high temperature of 42.6 degrees Celsius (108.7 F) hit the French capital.
1463283_web1_gtr-euroheat08-072619
AP
A man cools off in a beach shower during a hot summer day at the beach in De Haan, Belgium, Thursday, July 25, 2019. Belgium experienced code red, extreme heat warning, on Thursday as temperatures soared during the second heat wave of the summer.
1463283_web1_gtr-euroheat10-072619
AP
A woman sits on a breakwater in front of the Mediterranean sea in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, July 25, 2019. Parts of Europe saw record-high temperatures on Thursday as much of the continent was trapped in a heat wave, the second in two months.

PARIS (AP) — They frolicked in fountains, jumped in lakes and canals, waded in the sea. And no wonder. It was, after all, one of Europe’s hottest-ever days.

As the temperature climbed and climbed to record highs in multiple countries Thursday, people converged on any body of water they could find.

In Paris, the fountains beneath Trocadero plaza across from the Eiffel Tower became the city’s new nucleus.

Local families, vacationing college students, tourists form Brazil, the Netherlands, Chicago and beyond — they all had the same idea.

Some just shed their shoes; others stripped down to their underwear. With temperatures reaching 42.6 degrees Celsius (108.7 degrees Fahrenheit), modesty was the least of anyone’s concerns.

Crowds packed the beaches of Belgium, swimming, lounging in the waves, or riding horses through the shallow waters along the shore at De Haan. The country hit its all-time temperature high of 40.7 C (105.3 F).

Barcelona’s beaches drew crowds of their own, performing acrobatic dives or just seeking relief in the seaside breeze.

Outdoor pools swarmed with swimmers in England, which saw temperatures reach 38.1 C (100.6 F).

And why not?

Categories: News | Daily Gallery
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.