For trans people, gender-swap photo filters are no mere game | TribLIVE.com
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For trans people, gender-swap photo filters are no mere game

Associated Press
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AP
In this Wednesday, May 15, 2019, photo, Bailey Coffman shows her photo as a man in the Snapchat app during an interview in New York. Snapchat’s new photo filter that allows users to change into a man or woman with the tap of a finger isn’t necessarily fun and games for transgender people. But some others see the potential for such tools to lead to self-discovery among people struggling with their gender identity.
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AP
Savannah Daniels poses for a photo, Thursday, May 16, 2019, in Baltimore. Daniels, 32, a military veteran living in Baltimore says she realized she identified as female by watching episodes of “RuPaul’s Drag Race” television series while serving in Afghanistan as a chaplain’s assistant in the U.S. Navy.

Snapchat’s new photo filter that allows users to change into a man or woman with the tap of a finger isn’t necessarily fun and games for transgender people.

Some say it reduces their very real and often painful experiences to folly.

Thirty-one-year-old Bailey Coffman is a transgender woman from New York. She says that “my gender is not a costume.”

But some others see the potential for such tools to lead to self-discovery among people struggling with their gender identity.

Elliott Wheeler, a 16-year-old high school student in Michigan, goes by the name Ellie. She says she hopes “this does help some people better recognize their gender.”

Snapchat maker Snap Inc. says in a statement that its design team continues work to ensure its filters are diverse and inclusive.

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