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Pediatrician, Native American health advocate to speak at Saint Vincent

| Monday, April 9, 2018, 5:54 p.m.

Dr. Brian Volck, a pediatrician, writer and advocate for the health of Native American children and families in poverty, will speak Thursday at Saint Vincent College on “Attending Others: A Doctor's Education in Bodies and Words.”

The title of his 7:30 p.m. lecture in the Fred M. Rogers Center is that of his recent book, in which he recounts his education in “the mysteries of suffering bodies, powerful words and natural beauty.”

Admission is free, but reservations are required by logging on to eventregistration.stvincent.edu/TLSS18 or by calling 724-805-2177. Tickets will be held at the box office on the college's Unity campus.

Volck, who holds degrees in English literature and creative writing, published his first collection of poetry, Flesh Becomes Word, in 2013. He is co-author of Reclaiming the Body: Christians and the Faithful Use of Modern Medicine.

He is working on a memoir and a book on the intersection of health, history and culture in the Navajo nation.

Volck has provided pediatric care on a Navajo reservation, at an inner-city health center in Kentucky, at a storefront office and at a university-affiliated teaching practice. He was assistant professor of pediatrics in the Division of Hospital Medicine at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center from 2009 to 2017.

He mentors medical students and residents through the medical center's Global Child Health track and through the Initiative on Poverty, Justice and Health at the University of Cincinnati.

He speaks frequently on topics including medical ethics, theology, pediatric education, Native American child health and cross-cultural communication.

Volck's appearance is a joint presentation of the college's Threshold Series and of the Ann Kinzer Clark, M.D. Memorial Lecture Series, a cooperative effort with the Latrobe Area Hospital Charitable Foundation.

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