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Hampton students delve into home construction, on a small scale

| Monday, May 16, 2016, 2:12 p.m.
Hampton High School students helped to build a microhouse as part of a project-based learning experience. The students are shown in the house on the school campus on Tuesday, May 10, 2016.
Sidney Davis | Tribune-Review
Hampton High School students helped to build a microhouse as part of a project-based learning experience. The students are shown in the house on the school campus on Tuesday, May 10, 2016.
Hampton High School students helped to build a microhouse as part of a project-based learning experience. The project's teacher, Scott Stickney, and senior Phil Margaria look over the bed/seating area of the micro house on Tuesday, May 10, 2016.
Sidney Davis | Tribune-Review
Hampton High School students helped to build a microhouse as part of a project-based learning experience. The project's teacher, Scott Stickney, and senior Phil Margaria look over the bed/seating area of the micro house on Tuesday, May 10, 2016.

It's easy to mistake the wee abode for a glorified shed, complete with a picture window and built-in cupboards.

But what resembles a backyard playhouse eventually will include accommodations for indoor cooking and heating, plus outdoor showering.

“We'll have a hammock, so two people can sleep in it,” Phil Margaria, 18, said about the micro house that he's helping to build with fellow students behind Hampton High School.

The students are constructing the house with about $2,500 in donated and purchased materials. They expect to complete it by late May for possible giveaway through a fundraising raffle.

Guiding the project are enrichment teacher Scott Stickney and technology teacher Ryan Scott.

“We're pretty close to 40 square feet,” Stickney said about the structure's interior.

“It sits on a 4-foot-by-8-foot trailer,” Stickney said about the portable, 8-foot-tall building with a slanting roof.

Stickney expects to ultimately incorporate battery-powered lighting in the micro house, He also expects to draw electricity for the house from a portable generator and solar panels.

Helping to build the micro house during their free periods and lunch hours are freshman Ryan Perkins, 16; sophomores Nick Bello, 16, Viktoria Probeck, 15, and Rachel Mattson, 16; and juniors Kevin and Kameron Bott; both 17, and Teddy Breedlove, 17.

“I think I'm interested in engineering, but I wanted to learn more about it,” Probeck said about why she joined the building project.

Probeck envisions the micro house as more of a getaway than a place to live.

“It's not to live in, but to take on trips,” Probeck said.

Construction Junction donated about $400 in repurposed building supplies for the project, including the structure's 4-foot-by-6-foot picture window.

Stickney and his students also bought materials with about $2,000 in grants from the Sprout Fund, PPG Industries and Hampton High School Parent-Faculty Association.

“We started with some blueprints in the back of a book,” Stickney said about his latest adventure in project-based learning.

Stickney's previous projects include a mock, one week-long archaeological dig, also outside Hampton High School.

Deborah Deasy is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-772-6369 or ddeasy@tribweb.com.

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