Wolf calls for tougher gun laws after synagogue shooting | TribLIVE.com
Pennsylvania

Wolf calls for tougher gun laws after synagogue shooting

Associated Press
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FILE - In this Sept. 21, 2018, file photo Gov. Tom Wolf speaks at a campaign rally for Pennsylvania candidates in Philadelphia. With Wolf’s second term effectively underway, perhaps the biggest question in Pennsylvania’s Capitol is how Republicans who control the Legislature will re-emerge after suffering losses in the Nov. 6 election. The Republican majorities remain substantial, but they’re going to be the smallest since Wolf became governor in 2015. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
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Diana Reynolds, telling of the shooting death of her son, wipes a tear while speaking at a rally in the Pennsylvania Capitol’s rotunda calling for lawmakers to take action on anti-gun violence legislation on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019 in Harrisburg, Pa. (AP Photo/Marc Levy)
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Dr. Raquel Forsythe, a trauma surgeon from Pittsburgh who helped treat victims of the Oct. 27 mass shooting that killed 11 people in the Tree of Life synagogue, speaks at a rally in the Pennsylvania Capitol’s rotunda calling for lawmakers to take action on anti-gun violence legislation on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019 in Harrisburg, Pa. (AP Photo/Marc Levy)
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Jo Schlesinger, whose husband was badly wounded in the Oct. 27 mass shooting in Pittsburgh’s Tree of Life synagogue that killed 11 people, gets a hug from Cody Murphy after she spoke at a rally in the Pennsylvania Capitol’s rotunda calling for lawmakers to take action on anti-gun violence legislation on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019 in Harrisburg, Pa. Murphy lives across the street from the synagogue. (AP Photo/Marc Levy)
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Gov. Tom Wolf speaks at a rally in the Pennsylvania Capitol’s rotunda calling for lawmakers to take action on anti-gun violence legislation on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019 in Harrisburg, Pa. (AP Photo/Marc Levy)

HARRISBURG, Pa. — Gov. Tom Wolf is renewing his call for lawmakers to pass legislation expanding background checks on firearms in Pennsylvania and end an exception for shotguns, sporting rifles and semi-automatic rifles that are sold at gun shows.

The Democratic governor’s statement Tuesday comes three months after a truck driver walked into a Pittsburgh synagogue and fatally shot 11 people. Six were wounded, including four police officers.

The Republican-controlled Legislature last year passed legislating forcing people in Pennsylvania with a domestic violence ruling against them to more quickly surrender their guns.

However, the Legislature has long resisted gun-control measures, such as expanding background checks. The House’s Republican majority leader, Bryan Cutler, says Pennsylvania already has fairly comprehensive background checks and says policymakers instead might find agreement on mental health interventions.

Categories: News | Pennsylvania
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