Lawsuit: Pa. man had heart attack on Carnival ship, wasn’t allowed off, then died | TribLIVE.com
Pennsylvania

Lawsuit: Pa. man had heart attack on Carnival ship, wasn’t allowed off, then died

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Bloomberg

The family of Jeffrey Eisenman, a 65-year-old passenger on the Carnival Sunshine, alleges in a lawsuit that the world’s largest cruise company wouldn’t let him off of the ship after suffering a heart attack last December. Eisenman died on the way to another port.

A representative for Carnival said the cruise operator was looking into the matter and didn’t have an immediate comment.

Eisenman, of Marble, Pennsylvania, suffered a serious heart attack while the ship was docked at Grand Turk in the Turks and Caicos Islands on Dec. 3, according to a suit filed Wednesday in Miami federal court. Carnival’s doctor said Eisenman would need a stent implanted and that he should be flown to Miami because Grand Turk’s hospital wasn’t equipped with a cardiac unit.

Just before the ship’s 4 p.m. departure, the Eisenman family was told he couldn’t leave and the ship set sail for San Juan. The family had purchased insurance that would cover an air ambulance, according to the suit.

Eisenman died overnight on the ship, but the ordeal didn’t end there, the family said. Carnival told the Eisenmans that his corpse couldn’t be removed in Puerto Rico because the line couldn’t guarantee the body would be returned promptly from the hurricane-ravaged island. Eisenman’s wife and daughter left the ship in Puerto Rico, while his son stayed aboard, accompanying the body back to the continental U.S., according to the suit.

The Eisenmans allege the cruise line was negligent in not appreciating the severity of Eisenman’s condition and evacuating him quickly.

Carnival shares dropped 1% to $52.84 on Thursday. The stock was up 8.3% this year through Wednesday’s close, compared with a 15% gain for the S&P 500 Index.

Cruise lines have personnel specifically trained to handle critical unexpected incidents, according to the Cruise Line International Association. The industry doesn’t have a one-size-fits-all approach to care, which will vary depending on the situation, according to the group’s website.

Categories: News | Health Now | Pennsylvania
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