Perdue recalls frozen chicken tenders over undeclared wheat allergen | TribLIVE.com
Pennsylvania

Perdue recalls frozen chicken tenders over undeclared wheat allergen

Brian C. Rittmeyer
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USDA
Perdue Foods has recalled frozen breaded chicken breast tenders because of an undeclared wheat allergen. The recalled product was sold in five states including Pennsylvania.
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USDA
The back of the recalled Perdue Foods chicken package, showing the UPC bar code, best by date, plant code and time stamp included in the recall.

Perdue Foods is recalling about 495 pounds of a frozen, ready-to-eat chicken product because of misbranding and undeclared allergens that were shipped to stores in five states including Pennsylvania, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service announced.

According to the recall notice, the product contains wheat, a known allergen, which is not declared on the product label.

The chicken products are labeled as gluten-free chicken breast tenders but contain chicken nugget products, according to the USDA. They were made on Aug. 30.

The product subject to recall is “Simply Smart Organics Chicken Breast Tenders Gluten Free” in 22-ounce resealable plastic bags with a “best by” date of Aug. 29, 2020. The packages have a UPC bar code of 0-72745-80489-2, time stamps of 00:30 to 1:00 and establishment number P-33944 on the label.

In addition to Pennsylvania, the item was shipped to distributors and retail locations in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and Ohio.

The problem was discovered after the company received two complaints from consumers about the mislabeled product, according to the USDA.

No adverse reactions have been reported from people eating the product, the agency said.

Consumers who bought the product are urged not to eat it. The USDA advises consumers to throw it away or return it to the place of purchase.

Those with questions about the recall can contact Perdue Consumer Care at 866-866-3703.

Perdue recalled more than 68,000 pounds of Simply Smart Organics frozen chicken nuggets in January because they may have been contaminated with wood.

Also in January, Perdue Foods recalled more than 16,000 pounds of chicken nuggets because of undeclared milk ingredients.

Brian C. Rittmeyer is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Brian at 724-226-4701, [email protected] or via Twitter .

Categories: Local | Pennsylvania
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