Democrats promise swift action after win in Virginia | TribLIVE.com
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Democrats promise swift action after win in Virginia

Associated Press
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The Virginian-Pilot via AP
Candidate for the 94th District, Shelly Simonds, celebrates with supporters as election results begin to come in Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019, at the Marriott in Newport News, Va.
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AP
Voters walk through a sea of campaign signs at a polling station in Richmond, Va., Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019. All seats in the Virginia House of Delegates and State senate are up for election.
1906353_web1_1906353-f542d9e406f64e37bc506f97f46d22ef
The Virginian-Pilot via AP
Candidate for the 94th District, Shelly Simonds, delivers a speech to supporters Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019, at the Marriott in Newport News, Va.
1906353_web1_1906353-006f2c0eb5bb4a598c8a15a2da42b9df
AP
A mobile billboard urges voters to cast ballots for Democrats outside Centreville High School in Clifton, Va., Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019.
1906353_web1_1906353-d7ba2be2c7514c0dbab80865bc6b48f5
AP
Voters walk through a sea of campaign signs at a polling station in Richmond, Va., Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019. All seats in the Virginia House of Delegates and State senate are up for election.
1906353_web1_1906353-4920a5ed6e8a4735b3a4dc480aab870f
The Free Lance-Star via AP
Declan Brady peeks under the voting booth while his grandmother Darlene Walker votes at Drew Middle School on Election Day in Stafford, Va., Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019.

RICHMOND, Va. — Virginia Democrats promised swift action on a host of liberal policy proposals now that they’ve won full control of state government for the first time in more than two decades.

Democratic leaders said Virginians should expect a higher minimum wage, new gun restrictions and greater abortion rights after their party flipped control of the state House and Senate in Tuesday’s election. They also promised ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment, making Virginia the final state needed for possible passage of the gender equality measure.

With Democratic Gov. Ralph Northam already in office, Democrats will now have full control of the statehouse for the first time in 26 years.

“Tomorrow the work begins and the people want to see results,” Sen. Dick Saslaw, poised to be the next Senate majority leader when lawmakers return to the Capitol in January, told supporters at a victory party in Richmond. “And let me tell you, for God’s sake, they’re going to get results.”

Tuesday’s victory extended the Democrats’ winning streak under President Donald Trump.

Suburban voters turned out in big numbers to back Democratic candidates, continuing a trend of once GOP-friendly suburbs turning blue. This is the third election in a row in which Virginia Democrats made significant gains since President Donald Trump was elected.

The Democrats’ big win was a warning sign for the president and Republicans ahead of next year’s election. Higher-educated and more affluent suburban voters — particularly women — have revolted against Trump’s GOP both in Virginia and nationwide. The suburbs leaned Republican in the past but have become a key battleground amid shifting demographics and Trump’s turbulent presidency.

Tuesday was a rough night for many suburban Republicans in Virginia. Del. Tim Hugo lost his spot as the last Republican representing Fairfax County, northern Virginia’s most populous suburban jurisdiction.

Of the four states with legislative elections this year, Virginia was the only one where control of the statehouse was up for grabs. Republicans lost their slim majorities in both the state House and Senate.

National groups, particularly those aligned with Democrats, pumped huge amounts of money into the contests to test-drive expensive messaging and get-out-the-vote campaigns ahead of the 2020 balloting. Gun control and clean-energy groups affiliated with former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg spent several million dollars helping Democrats.

Virginia also drew several high-profile visits from 2020 presidential hopefuls, including former Vice President Joe Biden, as well as current Vice President Mike Pence.

President Donald Trump tried to rally Republicans via Twitter but stayed out of Virginia, a state he lost in 2016.

The only candidate Trump endorsed by name, Republican Geary Higgins, was handily defeated in a northern Virginia Senate district previously held by the GOP.

Gary Keener and wife Marthanne Huffines-Keener, of Glen Allen, a suburb just north of Richmond, said they voted Republican for years but have voted Democrat since the 2008 election of former President Barack Obama. They said Trump definitely had a large impact on Virginia’s election.

“We didn’t want to make that our only reason for coming out,” Keener said. “But he’s a baboon. We do some traveling, and wherever we go, we’re embarrassed.”

Republicans hoped an off-year election with no statewide candidates on the ballot would help defuse the anti-Trump energy that powered previous cycles. GOP lawmakers also bet on the specter of a possible Trump impeachment providing a last-minute surge by motivating the Republican base. Republicans were able to hold on to several seats in close races but expressed disappointment with the overall outcome of the night.

House Majority Leader Todd Gilbert on Tuesday predicted that Democrats would pursue an “extreme agenda” that would undo Republican efforts to make Virginia a business-friendly state.

“Virginians should expect public policies that look a lot more like the train-wreck that is California than the Virginia of good fiscal management and common-sense conservative governance,” Gilbert said in a statement.

Democrats were keenly focused on gun issues during the election, saying Republicans should be held accountable for failing to pass new restrictions after a mass shooting in Virginia Beach earlier this year.

Republicans accused Democrats of trying to use the tragedy for political gain while focusing heavily on past Democratic efforts to loosen restrictions for third-trimester abortion.

The Democratic victories Tuesday will make the legislature more diverse. Sen.-elect Ghazala Hashmi is the first Muslim-American woman to serve in the Senate. Del. Danica Roem, who made history as the first openly transgender person elected and seated in a U.S. state legislature, easily won reelection.

Jenne Nurse, a 25-year-old who recently accepted a state government job, said she’s excited about the increasing diversity.

“It’s nice to see the Virginia Legislature look like Virginia. It’s so important,” said Nurse, who is black.

Tuesday’s election could help cement Democratic rule for the next decade, because the winners will decide who controls the next redistricting process. Lawmakers approved a proposed constitutional amendment this year that would create a new bipartisan commission empowered to draw legislative and congressional maps. Democrats have to sign off on it again next year before presenting it to voters.

Categories: News | Politics Election
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