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Rod Rosenstein stared blankly during Attorney General William Barr’s news conference | TribLIVE.com
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Rod Rosenstein stared blankly during Attorney General William Barr’s news conference

Frank Carnevale
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Getty Images
Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein joins Attorney General William Barr as he speaks during a press conference on the release of the redacted version of the Mueller Report at the Department of Justice April 18, 2019 in Washington.
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Getty Images
Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein listens while Attorney General William Barr speaks during a press conference about the release of the Mueller Report at the Department of Justice April 18, 2019, in Washington.
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AP
Attorney General William Barr speaks alongside Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, right, and acting Principal Associate Deputy Attorney General Edward O’Callaghan, left, about the release of a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report during a news conference, Thursday, April 18, 2019, at the Department of Justice in Washington.
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AP
Attorney General William Barr speaks alongside Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, right, and acting Principal Associate Deputy Attorney General Edward O’Callaghan, rear left, about the release of a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report during a news conference, Thursday, April 18, 2019, at the Department of Justice in Washington.

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein joined Attorney General William Barr at the podium Thursday for Barr’s news conference to talk about Robert Mueller’s special counsel’s report on Russia interference into the 2016 election.

At the news conference, Barr stated what he said was the “bottom line” of the report: No collusion between the Trump campaign and Russian government hackers.

But Rosenstein stared blankly, and did not blink at times, for the duration of the news conference. People on Twitter took note.

During his remarks, Barr thanked Rosenstein for his help throughout the process: “He had well-deserved plans to step back from public service that I interrupted by asking him to help in my transition. Rod has been an invaluable partner, and I am grateful that he was willing to help me and has been able to see the Special Counsel’s investigation to its conclusion. Thank you, Rod.”

The third man on the stage was Edward O’Callaghan, a former assistant U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, who joined the Department of Justice earlier this month as a principal associate deputy attorney general.

Trump nominated Rosenstein to serve as Deputy Attorney General on Feb. 1, 2017. But since then, the president has attacked Rosenstein on several occasions. He was set to step down from the Justice Department last month.

PBS NewsHour posted video of the news conference.

Frank Carnevale is a Tribune-Review digital producer. You can contact Frank via Twitter .

Categories: News | Politics Election
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